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Authors:

Chakema Carmack, PhD
Karina Serrano, BSH
Angelica Roncancio, PhD

Background:

Multiple studies have shown that African-American and Hispanic women have limited and inadequate knowledge about cervical cancer (CC) and CC screening, which contributes to morbidity and mortality disparities. Access to knowledge, education, and other socio-political factors are social determinants of health that serve to shape individual health behavior knowledge. Better CC knowledge has been shown to increase screening uptake.

Methods:

In the present study, we specified unique subgroups regarding CC prevention behaviors in a sample of African-American and Hispanic women (N = 328) recruited from a minority-serving higher education institution.

Results:

Latent class analysis identified 3 unique salient subgroups based on the indicators: CC Screening Adherers and Vaccinators (14%), CC Screening Adherers (48%), and CC Prevention Non-adherers (38%). We found probable variations within the classes regarding screening behavior, human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination status, and race/ethnicity. Women reporting higher guideline knowledge were 11 times more likely to be classified as CC Screening Adherers
and Vaccinators
than CC Prevention Non-adherers. Additionally, women who specifically understood that HPV causes cervical cancer were 16 and 9 times more likely to be classified as CC Screening Adherers and Vaccinators and CC Screening Adherers than to be classified as CC Prevention Non-adherers.

Conclusions:

Addressing cervical cancer knowledge remains an important intervention strategy in these populations to increase CC screening uptake.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 9, Number 1, January 2022, pp. 707-718(12)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: hhttps://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.9.1.8