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Authors:

Justin T. McDaniel, PhD Twitter
Kevin N. Hascup, PhD
Erin R. Hascup, PhD
David L. Albright, PhD
Juliane P. Wallace, PhD

Objective:

In this study, our aim was to improve understanding of the role of social support – which is the subject of a Healthy People 2030 goal – in the likelihood of adverse health behaviors among persons with subjective cognitive decline (SCD).

Methods:

We used a multinomial logistic regression model to examine the association between social support and alcohol misuse in a sample of individuals with SCD (N = 474) from the 2015-2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS).

Results:

Overall, 9.4% (95% CI = 6.7, 13.2) of the individuals with SCD reported “never” receiving needed social/emotional support and 7.0% (95% CI = 4.6, 10.5) of individuals with SCD reported “never” receiving help with activities of daily living. Results showed that 4.4% (95% CI = 2.7, 7.5) of participants reported heavy alcohol consumption, binge consumption of alcohol, or both. Lower scores on a 2-item composite measure of social support were associated with increased risk of binge consumption of alcohol with co-engagement in heavy alcohol use throughout the week (RRR = 1.92, p = .04) in adjusted analyses.

Conclusions:

We showed that low social support may be associated with an adverse health behavior among persons with SCD.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 9, Number 1, January 2022, pp. 628-635(8)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.9.1.1