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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
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Authors:

Natalie M. Golaszewski, PhD Twitter
John B. Bartholomew, PhD
Vanessa L. Errisuriz, PhD
Elizabeth Korinek, PhD
Esbelle Jowers, PhD

Objective:

In this study, we examined students’ fitness, body mass index (BMI), and demographics as predictors of observed time on-task (TOT) behaviors as an indicator of behavioral inattention.

Methods:

We collected demographics, fitness estimates, and BMI from 2020 fourth-graders (Mean age = 8.6 (SD = 0.5); 47% girls; 49% white) from 28 schools. We measured TOT through momentary time sampling observations. Three-level linear models were conducted to determine whether characteristics predicted differences in TOT. We tested interactions between characteristics and TOT.

Results:

Older students exhibited greater percent of TOT (estimate = 2.34, SE = 1.02, df = 919, t = 2.30, p < .05). Additionally, boys spent less percent TOT (estimate = -3.59, SE = 1.03, df = 906, t = -3.49, p < .05). There were no differences by race/ethnicity, SES, BMI, fitness, or time of day and percent TOT. Furthermore, none of the interactions were statistically significant (p > .15).

Conclusions:

Girls and older students spent more TOT. These findings are of interest to educators and psychologists working on the development of research-based guidelines aimed to support elementary students’ engagement in the classroom.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 2, March 2021, pp. 159-167(9)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.2.6