Youth

When US and State Governments Go Viral: In-person Reopening of Schools during the COVID-19 Pandemic – and Then What? – A Commentary

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Robert J. McDermott, PhD Twitter

Objective:

In this commentary I argue that rapid reopening of schools for in-person instruction in the United States is unwise and likely to extend the duration of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Methods:

I review various sources of information and raise issues less frequently and thoroughly addressed in noted plans to expedite school reopening.

Results:

Whereas the focus has been on preparing plans of action for in-person instruction on the first day of school that minimize risk to pupils and school personnel, aspects of these plans are operationally unsound. Additionally, opinions among school personnel and parents for rapid reopening are far from unanimous. Moreover, the potential health impact on teachers, bus drivers, and other school personnel, as well as pupils, and the potential for another shutdown are phenomena with real probability.

Conclusion:

Despite government-led arguments favoring rapid restoration of in-person instruction, I argue that school reopening should take a wiser approach, sustaining remote instruction until pandemic statistics place people at substantially reduced disease risk.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 7, Number 4, July 2020, pp. 366-373(8)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.7.4.10

2020-08-21T17:27:28-06:00August 21st, 2020|COVID19, Open Access, School Health, Youth|

“How Long Will Covid-19 Last?” And Other Questions Youth Ask Physicians about COVID-19

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Vanya Jones, PHD, MPH Twitter
Audrey Johnson, MBA
Megan Collins, MD, MPH
Panagis Galiatsatos, MD, MHS
Jacqueline Bryan
Susan Krenn, BA
Sherita H. Golden, MD, MHS
Alicia Wilson, JD

Objective:

In this investigation, we identify the questions youth in a low-income urban community asked healthcare providers about COVID-19.

Methods:

This formative qualitative study consisted of analyzing data collected using Poll Everywhere as part of 3 phone town halls with a pulmonary and critical care medicine physician and youth.

Results:

During the 3 town halls, there were 143 participants who asked 43 questions that were divided into 4 codes: Healthcare, Cure, General COVID-19, and Prevention.

Conclusion:

Youth have questions about healthy behaviors and treatment that can be answered in a low technology forum engagement with health professionals. These results also underscore the need to continue health education discussions either through traditional school-based or alternate formats, especially as we anticipate COVID-19 to last during the next academic year.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 7, Number 4, July 2020, pp. 342-346(5)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.7.4.7

2020-08-21T17:34:50-06:00August 21st, 2020|COVID19, Open Access, Youth|

COVID-19 School Closures: Implications for Pediatric Diabetes Management – A Commentary

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Rohit Jaswaney, BA Twitter
Jessica P. Cerdeña, MPhil Twitter

Objective:

The United States COVID-19 outbreak shuttered public and private schools, confining more than 55.1 million students to their homes. In this paper, we discuss the unique vulnerabilities faced by families affected by pediatric diabetes as well as structural issues exposed by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Methods:

Drawing on clinical and anthropological expertise, we review the unintended consequences of remote schooling for management of pediatric diabetes and other chronic health conditions.

Results:

We identify multiple barriers to pediatric diabetes care imposed by conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic. We propose a 4-tiered policy solution that aims to improve crisis response and to protect the health of children with chronic conditions, like diabetes, long-term.

Conclusion:

The COVID-19 pandemic has precipitated wide disruptions to schooling, employment, finances, and transportation, placing enormous burdens on families that care for a child with diabetes. Comprehensive policies supporting integrated diabetes care, student accommodations in remote learning conditions, extended medication
supplies, and increased healthcare access would not only prevent adverse outcomes for children with diabetes in crisis settings, but also lay a durable foundation needed to increase health equity of all children living with chronic conditions.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 7, Number 4, July 2020, pp. 325-328(4)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.7.4.5

2020-08-21T17:33:03-06:00August 21st, 2020|COVID19, Open Access, School Health, Youth|
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