Chronic Conditions

Non-reimbursable Workload in Pediatric Diabetes Care – the Providers’ Perspective

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Ksenia N. Tonyushkina, MD
Nicholas Koran
Ines Guttmann-Bauman, MD

Objective:

In this study, we quantified the amount of time that pediatric diabetes care providers spend in non-reimbursable activities and evaluated the predictors related to clinic structure and educational and behavioral care diabetes support.

Methods:

We distributed an anonymous electronic survey via email to Pediatric Endocrine Society (PES) members and requested information about their practice and about non-reimbursable time spent during an average week not on call.

Results:

A total of 96 diabetes providers completed the survey. Most providers spent 1-2 hours a day on non-billable activities and 60% of them worked on weekends. Providers from medium sized programs and those without fellowships saw more patients than providers from small and large programs and those with fellowships. The same groups had the least assistance from certified diabetes care and education specialists (CDCES) and social workers. Providers from practices allowing CDCES to review blood glucose data and adjust insulin spent significantly less time on this activity themselves.

Conclusions:

We call for the development of new reimbursement models, noting increasing demands of technology, need for longitudinal care between visits and ensuring sustainability and equity of pediatric diabetes care.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 9, Number 3, May 2022, pp. 839-845(7)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.9.3.1

2022-06-11T16:14:01-06:00June 11th, 2022|Chronic Conditions, Clinicians, Healthcare Delivery|

The Intersection of Education and Healthcare: Supporting Children with Chronic Health Conditions

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Arnold Olszewski, PhD, CCC-SLP Twitter
Donna R. Scarborough, PhD, CCC-SLP
Gregory A. Szumlas, MD, FAAP

Objective:

Chronic health conditions in childhood have been negatively associated with linguistic, academic, and occupational outcomes. Traditionally, categorical diagnostic approaches relying on exclusionary criteria are used in healthcare services.

Methods:

This literature review examines research from various fields to evaluate the effects of chronic illness in cognitive-linguistic development in children. We explore the implications for different conceptualizations of the term “chronic illness.” We compare categorical and non-categorical diagnostic approaches, specifically in relation to children’s academic performance.

Results:

We provide recommendations for bridging the gap between healthcare and education to provide children with chronic conditions the best chance of thriving medically and academically. Definitions of chronic illness that rely on inclusive criteria and acknowledge individual variability seem best suited for clinical practice and research.

Conclusions:

Effective supports for children with chronic illness require evidence-based treatment approaches that are tailored to the unique needs of each individual child. Educators, healthcare providers, families, and related service providers must have open lines of communication to serve children with chronic health conditions. Early identification and intervention is crucial.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 2, March 2021, pp. 184-193(10)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.2.8

2021-04-29T21:50:23-06:00April 26th, 2021|Chronic Conditions, Research Methods, Youth|
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