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So far Steven Rowe has created 24 blog entries.

Utilizing Partnerships to Identify Community Needs and Analyze Network Collaboration in Public Health

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Daenuka Muraleetharan, PhD
Ellen Jones, PhD
Josh McCawley, MPH
Katherine Ferrell Fouquier, CNM, PhD, FACNM
Whitney Garney, PhD, MPH
Kelly Wilson, PhD, MCHES

Objective:

LinkedUp is a multi-sector partnership focused on linking older teens (ages 17-19) to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services at school-based health centers (SBHCs) in Mississippi. The purpose of this study was to examine key partnerships in LinkedUp development, focusing on community needs that initiated the formation of the partnership, and patterns of collaboration among these partners.

Methods:

In 2018, researchers conducted interviews (N = 3) and focus groups (N = 9) with Mississippi school administrators and high school and college students. In 2019, evaluators examined collaboration between these community partners (N = 6) using an interorganizational network analysis survey.

Results:

Thematic analyses of qualitative data indicated a need to commit to linking older teens to SRH services by increasing communication/planning among community stakeholders. Network analysis scores included an average network density of 1, strength of tie of 3.04, and degree centrality of 4.6 (SD = 1.4) for partners.

Conclusions:

Our findings illustrate how community stakeholders inform the development of a public health program as critical partners during both needs assessment and program development phases. This information can be used by practitioners and policymakers interested in addressing complex, community-level health issues.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 1, January 2021, pp. 48-59(12)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.1.5

2021-02-22T08:43:37-07:00February 22nd, 2021|Community Health, Program Planning|

An Evidence Base for School Health Policy during the COVID-19 Pandemic

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Saif Badran, MD, MRCS(Ed)*
Omran A.H. Musa, MA* Twitter
Somaya Al-maadeed, PhD, SMIEE
Egon Toft, MD, PhD
Suhail A. Doi, MBBS, PhD

* These authors contributed equally.

Objective:

Children represent a small fraction of confirmed COVID-19 cases, with a low case fatality rate (CFR). In this paper, we lay out an evidence-based policy for reopening schools.

Methods:

We gathered age-specific COVID-19 case counts and identified mortality data for 14 countries. Dose-response meta-analysis was used to examine the relationship of the incremental case fatality rate (CFR) to age. In addition, an evidence-to-decision framework (EtD) was used to correlate the dose-response data with other epidemiological characteristics of COVID-19 in childhood.

Results:

In the dose-response analysis, we found that there was an almost negligible fatality below age 18. CFR rose little between ages 5 to 50 years. The confidence intervals were narrow, suggesting relative homogeneity across countries. Further data suggested decreased child-hood transmission from respiratory droplets and a low viral load among children.

Conclusions:

Opening up schools and kindergartens is unlikely to impact COVID-19 case or mortality rates in both the child and adult populations. We outline a robust plan for schools that recommends that general principles not be micromanaged, with authority left to schools and monitored by public health authorities.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 1, January 2021, pp. 40-47(8)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.1.4

2021-02-22T08:41:57-07:00February 22nd, 2021|COVID19, Health Policy, School Health|

North American Jewish Day Schools’ Online Promotion of Physical Education

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

David Kahan, PhD
Thomas L. McKenzie, PhD
Roman Fedoriouk

Objective:

Parents and other stakeholders regularly view school websites for important information including curricula. Over 300,000 students are enrolled in North American Jewish day schools, but little is known about schools’ online promotion of physical education (PE). We conducted a content analysis of the mention of various PE characteristics and their association with school characteristics.

Methods:

We systematically tallied mention of 7 PE characteristics and 4 school characteristics on the websites of 516 Jewish day schools located in 237 North American cities. Descriptive statistics and cross-tabulations were used to analyze proportions for each characteristic and associations among them.

Results:

PE and curriculum were the only characteristics mentioned on over 50% of the websites. The mention of 4 PE characteristics (health messaging, facilities, PE, curriculum) was strongly associated with the religious affiliation of schools. Specifically, websites of liberal schools and traditional schools were more and less likely, respectively, to mention the characteristics.

Conclusions:

The websites of Jewish day schools insufficiently promoted PE characteristics with large differences based on religious affiliation. Surveying school officials responsible for website content about their beliefs on PE generally and the appropriateness of websites for promoting it may help inform strategies for boosting its online presence.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 1, January 2021, pp. 28-39(12)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.1.3

2021-02-22T08:38:19-07:00February 22nd, 2021|Physical Activity, School Health|

The Gap between Perception and Reality: Obstacles to Public School Use of Produce from Small Local Farms in the Southeastern United States

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Kathryn A. Boys, PhD
Angela M. Fraser, PhD

Objective:

Connecting farms to school foodservice operations is complex. Our purposes in this study were to: (1) identify and assess self-reported benefits and challenges to procurement and use of produce purchased directly from small farms in school foodservice operations, and (2) determine if opinions about procurement from small farms significantly differs between those with and without experience purchasing these products.

Methods:

An online survey was conducted with child nutrition directors from 3 southeastern states in the United States. Statistical tests assessed differences in opinions between those with and without experience purchasing with these products.

Results:

Directors without experience understood the benefits but significantly overestimated the difficulty in obtaining and using these products. Experience shaped director perceptions regarding perceived procurement challenges related to contract terms, ordering challenges, food safety practices, and ability of small farms to supply foodservice needs.

Conclusions:

Challenges exist in procuring produce from small farms (eg, lack of coordinated ordering, delivery, and communications processes, insufficient availability of products, and limited value-added processing). Sourcing products directly from these farms is not as onerous as perceived to be. Bridging the identified information gaps could increase participation in farm-to-school programs.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 1, January 2021, pp. 13-27(15)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.1.2

2021-02-22T08:36:56-07:00February 22nd, 2021|Nutrition, School Health|

Zoom (Virtual) Happy Hours and Drinking During COVID-19 in the US An Exploratory Qualitative Study

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Sheila Pakdaman, MS Twitter
John D. Clapp, PhD, MSW

Objective:

In this study, we investigated video conferencing platforms (eg, Zoom) used as a means to gather virtually as a unique drinking environment during the pandemic.

Methods:

Using online recruitment strategies, we conducted 42 qualitative Zoom® interviews. Interviewees were 21-64 years of age from various locations in the United States.

Results:

During the pandemic, most individuals reported higher drinking intake to offset boredom and stress. As a drinking environment, video conferencing calls were perceived as poor substitutes for in-person drinking interactions.

Conclusions:

Our data suggest drinking behaviors and contexts changed during the pandemic restrictions, but virtual happy hours did not drive this change.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 1, January 2021, pp. 3-12(10)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.1.1

2021-02-22T08:35:29-07:00February 22nd, 2021|Alcohol, COVID19|

Why it is Important for School-age Children to Have Breakfast – A Commentary

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Irene Rutigliano, MD
Gianpaolo De Filippo, MD, PhD
Angelo Campanozzi, MD

Objective:

In this commentary we emphasize the importance of breakfast for children, both from the point of view of proper nutritional education and as a strategy for the prevention of obesity.

Methods:

We reviewed the international literature, drawing particularly on information regarding the possible negative effects of skipping breakfast.

Results:

Obese children often do not eat breakfast and may face metabolic problems such as insulin resistance and hypercholesterolemia. The child who does not eat breakfast often becomes an adult who does not eat breakfast. The role of parents is fundamental in the acquisition of correct eating habits.

Conclusions:

The awareness that habits during childhood become elements of everyday life in adulthood, makes us understand the importance of the long-term consequences of skipping breakfast during childhood and adolescence.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 7, Number 6, December 2020, pp. 604-607(4)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.7.6.9

2020-12-30T13:58:58-07:00December 30th, 2020|Nutrition, Open Access|

Sex Differences in Body Mass Index, Mediterranean Diet Adherence, and Physical Activity Level among Italian Adolescents

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Francesca Mastorci, PhD
Cristina Doveri
Gabriele Trivellini
Anselmo Casu, BS
Luca Bastiani, BS
Alessandro Pingitore, MD, PhD,
Cristina Vassalle, PhD

Objective:

Unhealthy lifestyle habits during adolescence are linked to a higher risk of chronic degenerative disease during adulthood. The aim of this study was to assess the lifestyle habits among Italian adolescents, considering the potential influence of sex.

Methods:

Data were collected from 1707 eligible students. Demographic, dietary, and lifestyle data were collected, by using KIDMED and PAQ-C instruments.

Results:

The overall population had a medium adherence to a Mediterranean diet (58%, KIDMED score: 2.11 ± 0.64). There was no statistically significant difference in adherence by sex. We found boys to be more physically active than girls (p < .001). Considering ponderal index status, boys had turned out to be more overweight and obese respectively (13% and 4% respect to 10% and 2% in female population, p < .05, respectively), due to the presence of only one risk factor (medium or low both in diet and in physical activity score).

Conclusions:

Our results showed that our population stands at average levels both for its adherence to the Mediterranean diet and for physical activity, with males having a higher percentage of overweight and obesity. Importantly, in contrast to girls, boys have a higher risk of obesity, also in the presence of a single risk factor.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 7, Number 6, December 2020, pp. 596-603(8)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.7.6.8

2020-12-30T13:59:50-07:00December 30th, 2020|Adolescents, Nutrition, Open Access, Physical Activity|

Assessing Fish to School Programs at 2 School Districts in Oregon

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Addison Virta, MPH, RD
David C. Love, MSPH, PhD

Objective:

Farm to school (FTS) programs provide many established benefits to students and the community; however, fish to school programs are a less studied subset of FTS. The objective was to identify how fish to school programs are implemented, their impacts, and the enabling factors to support these programs.

Methods:

We conducted formative research and interviewed stakeholders from 2 school districts in Oregon in 2019.

Results:

Interviewees reported benefits of connecting students and the larger school community with local food and creating excitement from new lunch offerings. Factors that facilitated fish to school programs included strong program leaders and partnerships, FTS grant funding, and the creative use of resources. Challenges in maintaining the program included sustainable program funding, seafood distribution networks, recipe development, and higher cost per serving of seafood compared to other proteins.

Conclusions:

Resources exist for school professionals interested in starting or sustaining fish to school programs. These programs are difficult to launch and sustain, and thus, require many forms of support (institutional, financial, industry, culinary, etc) and benefit from innovations like fish to school aggregators and product development such as pre-prepared fish options.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 7, Number 6, December 2020, pp. 557-569(13)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.7.6.5

2020-12-30T13:56:29-07:00December 30th, 2020|Nutrition, Open Access, School Health|

Healthcare Utilization and Perceived Health Status among Falun Gong Practitioners in Taiwan

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Yu-Whuei Hu, PhD
Li-Shan Huang, PhD
Eric J. Yeh, PhD
Mai He, MD, PhD

Objective:

Falun Gong (FLG) is a practice of mind and body focusing on moral character improvement that includes meditative exercises. In this study, we explored perceived health status, healthcare resource utilization, and related factors among Taiwanese FLG practitioners, compared to themselves before practicing FLG, and also to the general Taiwanese norm, as reported by the 2001 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS).

Methods:

This cross-sectional study was based on a voluntary, paper-based survey conducted from October 2002 to February 2003 using the same Taiwanese SF-36 instrument employed by the NHIS. Primary outcomes included 8 SF-36 domain scores and the number of outpatient visits. One-sample t-tests, oneway ANOVA, and multivariate linear regression analyses were used.

Results:

The response rate was 75.6% (1210/1600). Compared to the norm, the study cohort had significantly higher scores in 6 of 8 SF-36 domains across sex and age (p < .05). Among those with chronic diseases, 70% to 89% reported that their conditions were improved or cured. Additionally, 74.2% and 79.2% participants stopped drinking alcohol and quit smoking; 62.7% reported decreased outpatient visits (mean before = 11.96; mean after = 5.87; norm = 14.4).

Conclusion:

In this cohort, FLG participants had higher perceived health scores than the population norm and reduced outpatient visits than before practice.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 7, Number 6, December 2020, pp. 511-531(21)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.7.6.2

Professional Development for Elementary School Teachers in Nutrition Education: A Content Synthesis of 23 Initiatives

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Louisa R. Peralta, PhD Twitter
Thea Werkhoven, PhD
Wayne G. Cotton, PhD
Dean A. Dudley, PhD

Objective:

Although the importance of healthy eating is well known, eating patterns among school-aged children and adolescents rarely meet dietary guidelines. Schools are an effective and efficient setting for nutrition education; however, there is a dearth of research focusing on the key role of the teacher. In this study, we identified the role of professional development (PD) for elementary school teachers in delivering nutrition education programs.

Methods:

We used the results of a systematic literature search and meta-analysis to synthesize PD content reported in successful elementary school nutrition education programs (ie, ones reporting positive and significant changes in elementary school students’ nutritional outcomes).

Results:

Few studies provided evidence or methodologic descriptions of teacher PD. Of the 23 nutrition education programs assessed for descriptions of teacher PD, 14 provided print and electronic information or people resources, 12 detailed who delivered the teacher PD, and 11 described the PD duration.

Conclusion:

Our findings from this content synthesis suggest that whereas teachers can make improvements in nutritional outcomes, the teacher PD component is not only underreported but also understudied. Therefore, the role of teacher PD is not widely understood, particularly the extent to which teacher PD influences teacher pedagogical practices and student nutritional outcomes.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 7, Number 5, October 2020, pp. 374-396(23)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.7.5.1

2020-10-15T10:20:53-06:00October 15th, 2020|Nutrition|
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