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So far Steven Rowe has created 7 blog entries.

Creating Healthy Schools with Middle School Students as Change Makers

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Elaine S. Belansky, PhD Twitter
Kathleen Lohmiller, PhD
Benjamin C. Ingman, PhD
Nick Cutforth, PhD
Sharon Scarbro, MS
Laura Borley, MS

Objective:

The Working Together Project (WTP) is a classroom-based curriculum in which rural, low-income middle school students completed “Assess. Identify. Make it Happen,” a strategic planning process to improve student health by implementing evidence-based initiatives. The curriculum consisted of 30, 55-minute lessons and 28 “workdays” for students to conduct research, create communication materials, and develop presentations. Study goals were to: (1) assess the extent to which the WTP led to the implementation of evidence-based practices; and (2) describe student-level outcomes that resulted from participating in the WTP.

Methods:

We conducted a quasi-experimental, convergent mixed-methods study with 4 intervention and 2 control middle schools located in a low-income, rural region. We carried out pre/post student surveys and interviews with teachers, principals, and students.

Results:

Two of the 4 intervention schools completed the entire curriculum and implemented evidence-based practices. Students in control schools showed a decline in school connection, academic engagement, and knowledge of health problems, whereas students in the intervention arm showed increases in personal responsibility to solve problems, 21st century skills, school connectedness, and program planning skills.

Conclusion:

When implemented fully, the WTP is a promising youth-led, adult-supported strategy for implementing evidence-based practices to promote health in schools.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 7, Number 3, May 2020, pp. 260-270(11)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.7.3.10

2020-06-25T11:39:36-06:00June 20th, 2020|Adolescents, Open Access, School Health|

The Effects of School Staff Food Allergy Education in a Large Urban School District

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Atoosa Kourosh, MD, MPH Twitter
Chinelo K. Nsobundu, RN, BSN, MPH, CHES
Ritu Khosla, BDS, MPH
Danielle Guffey, MS
Charles G. Minard, PhD
Anthony J. Levinson, MD, FRCPC, MSc
Carla M. Davis, MD

Objective:

In this study, we examined program feasibility and evaluated change in staff food allergy knowledge using an online course, in-person trainings, or a combination of these in a large urban school district.

Methods:

We used online surveys to identify and gather data on target and control school staff. In Year 1, target school staff were mandated to take online training with optional in-person training; in Year 2, all staff were mandated to take online training and target school staff received additional in-person training. Changes in food allergy knowledge, epinephrine availability, and reaction recognition were measured between groups and years.

Results:

Mandatory online training improved course completion among school staff members. Pre- and post-test scores demonstrated increased food allergy knowledge in those completing the online training course. The school-based food allergy awareness program led to heightened reaction recognition and treatment in target schools that received in-person education. Target school reactions were more appropriately treated than in controls.

Conclusion:

Online training is a feasible and effective tool for food allergy awareness, but in-person skills training may help prepare staff. The heightened reaction recognition and treatment in target schools reflects improved awareness and anaphylaxis preparedness.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 7, Number 3, May 2020, pp. 238-247(10)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.7.3.8

2020-06-25T11:28:51-06:00June 20th, 2020|Food Allergy, Open Access, School Health|

Parents’ Experiences with a School-based Dental Sealant Project in Central Appalachia: A Qualitative Study

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Sarah E. Raskin, PhD, MPH Twitter

Objective:

In this study, I describe parents’ experiences with a rural school-based dental sealant project (SBSP), a Healthy People 2020 objective for optimizing population-level protection against dental decay and reducing oral health disparities.

Methods:

I conducted parent interviews (N = 16) and coded them with NVivo 10, using deductive and inductive codes, from which I identified themes.

Results:

Parents enrolled children in the SBSP based on their confidence in local public institutions and the project’s convenience and accessibility. Parents did not understand the prevention orientation of the project, what services were offered or delivered, service limitations, or next steps, in particular their need to complete referrals to dentists. Parents’ recommendations for program improvement included strengthening communications and reviving a defunct dental public health mobile unit that had previously treated children’s existing dental problems.

Conclusion:

SBSPs should proactively identify and address family and contextual factors when planning and implementing projects. SBSPs should also strengthen case management capacity, collaborate with schools to bolster communications and message clarification, and be relieved of administrative and duplicate travel burdens that impede team members’ capacity to fulfill technical and case management-oriented duties, namely support the transition and maintenance of children into dental homes.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 7, Number 3, May 2020, pp. 215-222(8)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.7.3.6

2020-07-07T22:12:20-06:00June 20th, 2020|Open Access, Oral Health, Rural Health, School Health|

Midwest Consumer Shopping Habits, Nutrition Knowledge, and Latino Tienda Use

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Shelly M. Palmer, MS, RD
Donna M. Winham, DrPH, RD, MCHES Twitter

Objective:

In this study, we assessed the intrapersonal, interpersonal, and community influences on nutrition knowledge, views on healthy foods, grocery store choice, and grocery shopping patterns specifically at Latino tiendas, among Midwestern adults by Hispanic or non-Hispanic ethnicity.

Methods:

We surveyed a convenience sample of adults on an open-ended definition of healthy foods, nutrition knowledge, shopping behaviors, and reasons for store choice.

Results:

Of the 149 respondents, no ethnic differences were observed in qualitative definitions of healthy foods (low fat, unprocessed, high nutrient content). Fewer Hispanics than non-Hispanics correctly identified healthier options for rice, canned fruits, and canned tuna. Respondents indicated that proximity to home and food price were motivators of store choice. Significantly more Hispanics than non-Hispanics shopped at Walmart (42% vs 15%; p < .001), and at tiendas (77% vs 14%; p < .001). Food selection was the most frequent reason given by all for shopping at tiendas.

Conclusion:

Hispanics and non-Hispanics share similar views of healthy food definitions and important store characteristics. Non-Hispanics could potentially use tiendas more frequently considering expressed interests in food prices and selection. Some healthier food options that are culturally important were less known by Hispanics. Further research with a larger sample is needed to substantiate these preliminary findings.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 7, Number 2, March 2020, pp. 79-91(13)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.7.2.1

2020-04-22T14:48:45-06:00April 22nd, 2020|Nutrition, Open Access|

Are Our Lives the Experiment? COVID-19 Lessons during a Chaotic Natural Experiment – A Commentary

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Sarah L. Patrick, MPH, PhD Twitter
Holly C. Cormier, PhD

Objective:

In this paper, we urge health behavior and policy experts to engage in rigorous science and evaluation of the evolving natural experiment to stop or adapt to the pandemic of COVID-19.

Methods:

We conducted scientific literature, media library, and governmental website searches with key words COVID-19, policy, health behavior, and pandemic as a rapid review.

Results:

As of March 26, 2020, approximately one-third of the world’s population was under some COVID-related movement restriction. Moreover, 21 states in the United States initiated policies to stay-in-place, close businesses and schools, or create mechanisms for social distancing, with more states likely to take up these actions.

Conclusion:

As individuals and whole communities ascend Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs Scale, it is important to structure health behavior and policy evaluation and research to capture the lessons learned from this worldwide natural experiment of differing choices of support and restriction of individuals, groups, occupations, and whole countries. Whereas this may be the first pandemic of this magnitude and speed in the modern world, it likely will not be the last, making it imperative that we learn from and teach as many of these lessons as possible.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 7, Number 2, March 2020, pp. 165-169(5)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.7.2.10

2020-06-29T14:02:34-06:00April 19th, 2020|COVID19, Open Access|

Impact of COVID-19 on Persons in Correctional Facilities – A Commentary

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

David Wyatt Seal, PhD, FAAHB

Objective:

People who work in or who are confined to correctional facilities are at high risk for exposure to COVID-19. In this paper, I describe the at-risk populations in correctional facilities and identify mechanisms for reducing or minimizing rates of COVID-19 transmission.

Methods:

Risk reduction involves careful situational analysis and adaptation of communicable disease control procedures.

Results:

Prevention, identification and quarantine, and treatment are 3 steps that can reduce and minimize risk of infection to correctional facility workers and incarcerated individuals.

Conclusion:

Incarcerated individuals are particularly vulnerable to COVID-19 exposure, infection, and disease consequences due to their high incidence of chronic disease and poor health in general, as well as the conditions of confinement. Humane and immediate steps to prevent, diagnose, and treat COVID-19 among individuals in correctional settings are needed.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 7, Number 2, March 2020, pp. 161-164(4)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.7.2.9

2020-06-30T17:27:13-06:00April 19th, 2020|COVID19, Open Access|

Years of Neglecting Young and Old: Paying the Piper During COVID-19

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Annie Lu Nguyen, MPH, PhD Twitter
Robert J. McDermott, PhD

Objective:

In this paper, we argue that COVID-19 has demonstrated the seriousness of longstanding neglect of public education infrastructure, particularly where school health education and school-based health services are concerned, as well as having accentuated long-standing vulnerabilities among older adults.

Methods:

We examined practices about the divide between evidence-based recommendations of experts and system responses that leave a sizeable number of Americans vulnerable to the worst aspects of COVID-19.

Results:

We identify practices in schools, as well as institutions that respond to the needs of older Americans that increase general risk across generations from the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak. We also caution against making unwarranted assumptions or generalizations about older adults in and out of care settings.

Conclusion:

Authorities need to learn lessons from the present pandemic to avoid similar types of vulnerability in future public health emergencies.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 7, Number 2, March 2020, pp. 154-160(7)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.7.2.8

2020-06-29T13:38:54-06:00April 19th, 2020|COVID19, Open Access|