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So far Steven Rowe has created 29 blog entries.

The Intersection of Education and Healthcare: Supporting Children with Chronic Health Conditions

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Arnold Olszewski, PhD, CCC-SLP Twitter
Donna R. Scarborough, PhD, CCC-SLP
Gregory A. Szumlas, MD, FAAP

Objective:

Chronic health conditions in childhood have been negatively associated with linguistic, academic, and occupational outcomes. Traditionally, categorical diagnostic approaches relying on exclusionary criteria are used in healthcare services.

Methods:

This literature review examines research from various fields to evaluate the effects of chronic illness in cognitive-linguistic development in children. We explore the implications for different conceptualizations of the term “chronic illness.” We compare categorical and non-categorical diagnostic approaches, specifically in relation to children’s academic performance.

Results:

We provide recommendations for bridging the gap between healthcare and education to provide children with chronic conditions the best chance of thriving medically and academically. Definitions of chronic illness that rely on inclusive criteria and acknowledge individual variability seem best suited for clinical practice and research.

Conclusions:

Effective supports for children with chronic illness require evidence-based treatment approaches that are tailored to the unique needs of each individual child. Educators, healthcare providers, families, and related service providers must have open lines of communication to serve children with chronic health conditions. Early identification and intervention is crucial.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 2, March 2021, pp. 184-193(10)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.2.8

2021-04-29T21:50:23-06:00April 26th, 2021|Chronic Conditions, Research Methods, Youth|

School-level Factors and Consent Form Return Rate in a School-based Vision Program

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Holly Given, BS
Amanda Neitzel, PhD
Ahmed F. Shakarchi, MBChB, MPH
Megan E. Collins, MD, MPH Twitter

Objective:

School-based vision programs provide care directly in schools. Parental consent is typically required for student participation. In this paper, we examine school-level factors associated with consent form return.

Methods:

We included 123 schools served by a vision program in Baltimore, Maryland between the 2016-17 and 2018-19 school years. Multiple linear regression modeling was used to examine the associations between consent return rate and school type (elementary, elementary/middle or middle school), school size, student attendance, student mobility, percent of students in special education, poverty (percent eligible for free and reduced-price lunch), teacher qualifications, parent response rate to annual school climate survey, vision screening failure rate, and year of vision program participation (cohort).

Results:

The final model explained 26.2% of variability in consent return rate. Overall consent return rate was 57.8% (range 9.4%-100%). School size (β = -2.419, p < .01) and cohort (βCohort2 = 11.988, p < .01) were significantly associated with consent rate. Whereas poverty (β = 0.225, p < .10) and mobility (β = -0.647, p < .10) were relevant, they did not reach statistical significance.

Conclusions:

School-level factors are significantly associated with consent form return rates. School-based vision programs should consider additional measures to increase consent form return, especially in larger schools and schools with high rates of student mobility.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 2, March 2021, pp. 148-158(11)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.2.5

2021-04-30T14:04:40-06:00April 26th, 2021|Research Methods, Vision Health|

School Personnel’s Responses to School-based Vaping Prevention Program: A Qualitative Study

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Hongying Dai, PhD
Athena Ramos, PhD
Niran Tamrakar, MA
Marshall Cheney, PhD
Kaeli Samson, MA, MPH
Brandon Grimm, PhD

Objective:

In this qualitative study, we sought to assess 3 topics of interest: (1) current status of vaping and school-based prevention; (2) school personnel’s perceptions of vaping; and (3) challenges in implementing school-based vaping prevention programs.

Methods:

We conducted 5 focus groups using a semi-structured interview guide during October through December 2019. School personnel (eg, principals, teachers [N = 32]) from 30 middle and high schools were recruited across diverse regions in Nebraska.

Results:

Eight themes arose from the thematic analysis in 3 topic areas. School personnel attributed student vaping to easy access, low perception of harm, addiction, and proliferation of stealthy products for concealed use. Whereas schools showed strong support for addressing youth vaping on school grounds, few schools had adopted a comprehensive e-cigarette prevention and cessation program. The top challenges to current school-based vaping prevention programs include lack of time, knowledge, and coordinated efforts. Participants also recognized the significance of parental engagement in the prevention effort.

Conclusions:

There is a considerable variation in school policies and actions to address youth vaping. An evidence-based youth vaping program that involves schools, parents, students, and communities needs to be developed and disseminated in school settings.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 2, March 2021, pp. 130-147(18)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.2.4

2021-04-29T21:58:28-06:00April 26th, 2021|School Health, Tobacco|

A Pilot Study of a Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program in Elementary Schools: Be a Champion!

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Justin B. Moore, PhD, MS, FACSM Twitter
R. Glenn Weaver, PhD, MEd
Beverly J. Levine, PhD
Camelia R. Singletary, MPH
Russell L. Carson, PhD
Michael W. Beets, PhD, MPH, MEd
Darla M. Castelli, PhD
Aaron Beighle, PhD
Russell R. Pate, PhD

Objective:

In the present study, we sought to determine if a comprehensive school physical activity program (CSPAP) delivered using the Be a Champion! (BAC) framework was effective in increasing moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and decreasing sedentary time in elementary school youth.

Methods:

We implemented a CSPAP in 3 elementary schools to determine its effectiveness to youth behaviors compared to 2 control schools. Youth physical activity was assessed via accelerometry in spring 2015 and spring 2016 during school hours on school days. Implementation of the BAC components and youth behavior was assessed through direct observation from fall 2015 through winter 2016.

Results:

In a multilevel, mixed model examining the effects of intervention, we found no statistically significant effect of the intervention on overall MVPA. However, a significant increase in MVPA was observed among girls (but not boys) in the intervention schools relative to controls. No differences in sedentary behaviors were observed by group.

Conclusions:

CSPAP implementation may be effective in reducing sedentary time and increasing MVPA in girls, but not boys. Research is necessary to increase implementation dose and fidelity to best practices in physical activity promotion.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 2, March 2021, pp. 110-118(9)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.2.2

2021-04-29T22:00:01-06:00April 26th, 2021|Physical Activity, School Health|

Utilizing Partnerships to Identify Community Needs and Analyze Network Collaboration in Public Health

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Daenuka Muraleetharan, PhD
Ellen Jones, PhD
Josh McCawley, MPH
Katherine Ferrell Fouquier, CNM, PhD, FACNM
Whitney Garney, PhD, MPH
Kelly Wilson, PhD, MCHES

Objective:

LinkedUp is a multi-sector partnership focused on linking older teens (ages 17-19) to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services at school-based health centers (SBHCs) in Mississippi. The purpose of this study was to examine key partnerships in LinkedUp development, focusing on community needs that initiated the formation of the partnership, and patterns of collaboration among these partners.

Methods:

In 2018, researchers conducted interviews (N = 3) and focus groups (N = 9) with Mississippi school administrators and high school and college students. In 2019, evaluators examined collaboration between these community partners (N = 6) using an interorganizational network analysis survey.

Results:

Thematic analyses of qualitative data indicated a need to commit to linking older teens to SRH services by increasing communication/planning among community stakeholders. Network analysis scores included an average network density of 1, strength of tie of 3.04, and degree centrality of 4.6 (SD = 1.4) for partners.

Conclusions:

Our findings illustrate how community stakeholders inform the development of a public health program as critical partners during both needs assessment and program development phases. This information can be used by practitioners and policymakers interested in addressing complex, community-level health issues.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 1, January 2021, pp. 48-59(12)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.1.5

2021-04-29T22:01:17-06:00February 22nd, 2021|Community Health, Program Planning|

An Evidence Base for School Health Policy during the COVID-19 Pandemic

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Saif Badran, MD, MRCS(Ed)*
Omran A.H. Musa, MA* Twitter
Somaya Al-maadeed, PhD, SMIEE
Egon Toft, MD, PhD
Suhail A. Doi, MBBS, PhD

* These authors contributed equally.

Objective:

Children represent a small fraction of confirmed COVID-19 cases, with a low case fatality rate (CFR). In this paper, we lay out an evidence-based policy for reopening schools.

Methods:

We gathered age-specific COVID-19 case counts and identified mortality data for 14 countries. Dose-response meta-analysis was used to examine the relationship of the incremental case fatality rate (CFR) to age. In addition, an evidence-to-decision framework (EtD) was used to correlate the dose-response data with other epidemiological characteristics of COVID-19 in childhood.

Results:

In the dose-response analysis, we found that there was an almost negligible fatality below age 18. CFR rose little between ages 5 to 50 years. The confidence intervals were narrow, suggesting relative homogeneity across countries. Further data suggested decreased child-hood transmission from respiratory droplets and a low viral load among children.

Conclusions:

Opening up schools and kindergartens is unlikely to impact COVID-19 case or mortality rates in both the child and adult populations. We outline a robust plan for schools that recommends that general principles not be micromanaged, with authority left to schools and monitored by public health authorities.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 1, January 2021, pp. 40-47(8)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.1.4

2021-04-29T22:02:20-06:00February 22nd, 2021|COVID19, Health Policy, School Health|

North American Jewish Day Schools’ Online Promotion of Physical Education

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

David Kahan, PhD
Thomas L. McKenzie, PhD
Roman Fedoriouk

Objective:

Parents and other stakeholders regularly view school websites for important information including curricula. Over 300,000 students are enrolled in North American Jewish day schools, but little is known about schools’ online promotion of physical education (PE). We conducted a content analysis of the mention of various PE characteristics and their association with school characteristics.

Methods:

We systematically tallied mention of 7 PE characteristics and 4 school characteristics on the websites of 516 Jewish day schools located in 237 North American cities. Descriptive statistics and cross-tabulations were used to analyze proportions for each characteristic and associations among them.

Results:

PE and curriculum were the only characteristics mentioned on over 50% of the websites. The mention of 4 PE characteristics (health messaging, facilities, PE, curriculum) was strongly associated with the religious affiliation of schools. Specifically, websites of liberal schools and traditional schools were more and less likely, respectively, to mention the characteristics.

Conclusions:

The websites of Jewish day schools insufficiently promoted PE characteristics with large differences based on religious affiliation. Surveying school officials responsible for website content about their beliefs on PE generally and the appropriateness of websites for promoting it may help inform strategies for boosting its online presence.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 1, January 2021, pp. 28-39(12)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.1.3

2021-04-29T22:03:27-06:00February 22nd, 2021|Physical Activity, School Health|

The Gap between Perception and Reality: Obstacles to Public School Use of Produce from Small Local Farms in the Southeastern United States

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Kathryn A. Boys, PhD
Angela M. Fraser, PhD

Objective:

Connecting farms to school foodservice operations is complex. Our purposes in this study were to: (1) identify and assess self-reported benefits and challenges to procurement and use of produce purchased directly from small farms in school foodservice operations, and (2) determine if opinions about procurement from small farms significantly differs between those with and without experience purchasing these products.

Methods:

An online survey was conducted with child nutrition directors from 3 southeastern states in the United States. Statistical tests assessed differences in opinions between those with and without experience purchasing with these products.

Results:

Directors without experience understood the benefits but significantly overestimated the difficulty in obtaining and using these products. Experience shaped director perceptions regarding perceived procurement challenges related to contract terms, ordering challenges, food safety practices, and ability of small farms to supply foodservice needs.

Conclusions:

Challenges exist in procuring produce from small farms (eg, lack of coordinated ordering, delivery, and communications processes, insufficient availability of products, and limited value-added processing). Sourcing products directly from these farms is not as onerous as perceived to be. Bridging the identified information gaps could increase participation in farm-to-school programs.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 1, January 2021, pp. 13-27(15)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.1.2

2021-04-29T22:04:35-06:00February 22nd, 2021|Nutrition, School Health|

Zoom (Virtual) Happy Hours and Drinking During COVID-19 in the US An Exploratory Qualitative Study

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Sheila Pakdaman, MS Twitter
John D. Clapp, PhD, MSW

Objective:

In this study, we investigated video conferencing platforms (eg, Zoom) used as a means to gather virtually as a unique drinking environment during the pandemic.

Methods:

Using online recruitment strategies, we conducted 42 qualitative Zoom® interviews. Interviewees were 21-64 years of age from various locations in the United States.

Results:

During the pandemic, most individuals reported higher drinking intake to offset boredom and stress. As a drinking environment, video conferencing calls were perceived as poor substitutes for in-person drinking interactions.

Conclusions:

Our data suggest drinking behaviors and contexts changed during the pandemic restrictions, but virtual happy hours did not drive this change.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 1, January 2021, pp. 3-12(10)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.1.1

2021-04-29T22:05:37-06:00February 22nd, 2021|Alcohol, COVID19|
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