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So far Steven Rowe has created 15 blog entries.

Professional Development for Elementary School Teachers in Nutrition Education: A Content Synthesis of 23 Initiatives

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Louisa R. Peralta, PhD Twitter
Thea Werkhoven, PhD
Wayne G. Cotton, PhD
Dean A. Dudley, PhD

Objective:

Although the importance of healthy eating is well known, eating patterns among school-aged children and adolescents rarely meet dietary guidelines. Schools are an effective and efficient setting for nutrition education; however, there is a dearth of research focusing on the key role of the teacher. In this study, we identified the role of professional development (PD) for elementary school teachers in delivering nutrition education programs.

Methods:

We used the results of a systematic literature search and meta-analysis to synthesize PD content reported in successful elementary school nutrition education programs (ie, ones reporting positive and significant changes in elementary school students’ nutritional outcomes).

Results:

Few studies provided evidence or methodologic descriptions of teacher PD. Of the 23 nutrition education programs assessed for descriptions of teacher PD, 14 provided print and electronic information or people resources, 12 detailed who delivered the teacher PD, and 11 described the PD duration.

Conclusion:

Our findings from this content synthesis suggest that whereas teachers can make improvements in nutritional outcomes, the teacher PD component is not only underreported but also understudied. Therefore, the role of teacher PD is not widely understood, particularly the extent to which teacher PD influences teacher pedagogical practices and student nutritional outcomes.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 7, Number 5, October 2020, pp. 374-396(23)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.7.5.1

2020-10-15T10:20:53-06:00October 15th, 2020|Nutrition|

Oral Health and Mental Distress among Military Veteran Cancer Survivors: Insights from the 2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Joan M. Davis, RDH, PhD
Justin T. McDaniel, PhD Twitter
Musa Yahaya, MBBS, MPH
Robert J. McDermott, PhD

Objective:

Mental health issues occur among service members and veterans (SMVs). A cancerdiagnosis exacerbates these issues. Many veterans with poor mental health lack adequate dental care. We examined oral health and mental distress among SMV cancer survivors.

Methods:

We retrieved data from the 2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. We calculated theaverage number of mentally unhealthy days in the last 30 across categories of tooth removal (0, 1-5, ≥ 6 but not all, and all). We calculated state-based percentages of tooth removal (≥ 6 teeth) among SMV cancer survivors.

Results:

The greatest percentage of removal of ≥ 6 teeth among SMV cancer survivors occurred in Mississippi (50.3%), West Virginia (49.3%), and Kentucky (46.6%). Mental distress increased with the number of teeth removed. SMV cancer survivors with no history of tooth removal reported 2.08 mentally unhealthy days; 1-5 teeth removed, 2.34 days; ≥ 6 but not all, 3.20 days; and all teeth removed, 4.08 days.

Conclusion:

The history of ≥ 6 or more teeth removed increased SMV cancer survivor risk for mental distress. Tooth loss was particularly prevalent among veterans in the Mississippi Delta and Appalachia. Improving oral healthcare among veterans who are cancer survivors may reduce mental distress.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 7, Number 5, October 2020, pp. 452-460(9)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.7.5.7

2020-10-15T10:19:26-06:00October 15th, 2020|Oral Health, Veterans|

COVID-19 and People Who Use Drugs – A Commentary

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Suzan M. Walters, PhD Twitter
David W. Seal, PhD, FAAHB
Thomas J. Stopka, PhD, MHS
Megan E. Murphy, BS
Wiley D. Jenkins, PhD, MPH, FACE

Objective:

People who use drugs (PWUD) face increased risk of exposure to COVID-19, but also elevated risk associated from injection drug use. We describe factors underlying their increased risk and identify mechanisms for reducing or minimizing rates of COVID-19 transmission and other health outcomes.

Methods:

Our commentary draws upon empirical data, governmental and other reports, and field-based unpublished data from our own studies to inform our conclusion and recommendations.

Results:

Co-morbid health conditions (eg, diabetes), structural challenges (eg, homelessness, criminal justice involvement), stigma (eg, social devaluation, discrediting), and syndemic clustering of of overdose, HCV, and HIV among PWUD are exacerbated by COVID-19.

Conclusion:

Beyond the many challenges all people face to remain safe and healthy during the COVID-19 pandemic, PWUD face additional barriers to remaining safe not only from COVID-19 but from negative health outcomes associated with their living environments, socioeconomic positions, and injection drug use. Collaborative efforts among governmental agencies, health providers, SSPs, CBOs, and other agencies providing services to PWUD is essential to the development of programs and services to meet the many needs of PWUD, which have been particularly accentuated during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 7, Number 5, October 2020, pp. 489-497(9)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.7.5.11

2020-10-15T10:18:38-06:00October 15th, 2020|COVID19, Substance Use|

When US and State Governments Go Viral: In-person Reopening of Schools during the COVID-19 Pandemic – and Then What? – A Commentary

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Robert J. McDermott, PhD Twitter

Objective:

In this commentary I argue that rapid reopening of schools for in-person instruction in the United States is unwise and likely to extend the duration of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Methods:

I review various sources of information and raise issues less frequently and thoroughly addressed in noted plans to expedite school reopening.

Results:

Whereas the focus has been on preparing plans of action for in-person instruction on the first day of school that minimize risk to pupils and school personnel, aspects of these plans are operationally unsound. Additionally, opinions among school personnel and parents for rapid reopening are far from unanimous. Moreover, the potential health impact on teachers, bus drivers, and other school personnel, as well as pupils, and the potential for another shutdown are phenomena with real probability.

Conclusion:

Despite government-led arguments favoring rapid restoration of in-person instruction, I argue that school reopening should take a wiser approach, sustaining remote instruction until pandemic statistics place people at substantially reduced disease risk.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 7, Number 4, July 2020, pp. 366-373(8)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.7.4.10

2020-08-21T17:27:28-06:00August 21st, 2020|COVID19, Open Access, School Health, Youth|

Effects of a School Tobacco Policy on Student Smoking and Snus Use

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Håkan Källmén, PhD
Peter Wennberg, PhD
Tove Sohlberg, PhD
Matz Larsson, PhD, MD

Objective:

A school tobacco policy (STP) commonly is used to reduce smoking among adolescents, but the effectiveness of such programs is unclear. We evaluated the impact of an STP on tobacco use in 4 schools.

Methods:

The study included 4 intervention and 4 control schools, located in the inner city of Stockholm, Sweden. Schools self-selected for assignment to either an intervention program or a comparison group. In total, the study was comprised of 2671 students in grades 9 and 11, ages 15 to 18, and 1998 students (75%) responded to the questionnaire. We used a repeated cross-sectional design with assessment of tobacco use prevalence before implementation of the STP in 2016 and after 2 years under the program, in 2018.

Results:

Two years after the STP, the intervention school in grade 9 showed a lower prevalence (13.5% vs 1.6%) in the proportion of students who reported smoking (χ2 = 4.54; p < .05) whereas the proportion reporting snus use was practically unchanged. We found no statistically significant impact of the STP for grade 11.

Conclusion:

The results are promising with regard to smoking, when the STP is implemented in early adolescence.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 7, Number 4, July 2020, pp. 358-365(8)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.7.4.9

2020-08-21T17:36:10-06:00August 21st, 2020|Open Access, School Health, Tobacco|

“How Long Will Covid-19 Last?” And Other Questions Youth Ask Physicians about COVID-19

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Vanya Jones, PHD, MPH Twitter
Audrey Johnson, MBA
Megan Collins, MD, MPH
Panagis Galiatsatos, MD, MHS
Jacqueline Bryan
Susan Krenn, BA
Sherita H. Golden, MD, MHS
Alicia Wilson, JD

Objective:

In this investigation, we identify the questions youth in a low-income urban community asked healthcare providers about COVID-19.

Methods:

This formative qualitative study consisted of analyzing data collected using Poll Everywhere as part of 3 phone town halls with a pulmonary and critical care medicine physician and youth.

Results:

During the 3 town halls, there were 143 participants who asked 43 questions that were divided into 4 codes: Healthcare, Cure, General COVID-19, and Prevention.

Conclusion:

Youth have questions about healthy behaviors and treatment that can be answered in a low technology forum engagement with health professionals. These results also underscore the need to continue health education discussions either through traditional school-based or alternate formats, especially as we anticipate COVID-19 to last during the next academic year.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 7, Number 4, July 2020, pp. 342-346(5)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.7.4.7

2020-08-21T17:34:50-06:00August 21st, 2020|COVID19, Open Access, Youth|

COVID-19 School Closures: Implications for Pediatric Diabetes Management – A Commentary

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Rohit Jaswaney, BA Twitter
Jessica P. Cerdeña, MPhil Twitter

Objective:

The United States COVID-19 outbreak shuttered public and private schools, confining more than 55.1 million students to their homes. In this paper, we discuss the unique vulnerabilities faced by families affected by pediatric diabetes as well as structural issues exposed by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Methods:

Drawing on clinical and anthropological expertise, we review the unintended consequences of remote schooling for management of pediatric diabetes and other chronic health conditions.

Results:

We identify multiple barriers to pediatric diabetes care imposed by conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic. We propose a 4-tiered policy solution that aims to improve crisis response and to protect the health of children with chronic conditions, like diabetes, long-term.

Conclusion:

The COVID-19 pandemic has precipitated wide disruptions to schooling, employment, finances, and transportation, placing enormous burdens on families that care for a child with diabetes. Comprehensive policies supporting integrated diabetes care, student accommodations in remote learning conditions, extended medication
supplies, and increased healthcare access would not only prevent adverse outcomes for children with diabetes in crisis settings, but also lay a durable foundation needed to increase health equity of all children living with chronic conditions.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 7, Number 4, July 2020, pp. 325-328(4)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.7.4.5

2020-08-21T17:33:03-06:00August 21st, 2020|COVID19, Open Access, School Health, Youth|

Laws and Policies Related to the Health of US Immigrants: A Policy Scan

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Scott D. Rhodes, PhD, MPH, FAAHB Twitter
Lilli Mann-Jackson, MPH
Eunyoung Y. Song, PhD
Mark Wolfson, PhD
Alexandra Filindra, PhD
Mark A. Hall, JD

Objective:

We conducted a policy scan of state and local laws and policies across the United States (US) related to social determinants of health among immigrants.

Methods:

We collected all state and municipal laws and policies in 10 domains that had the potential to affect immigrant health from all 50 US states and the 30 most populous US metropolitan statistical areas. We coded these laws and policies and created an index of restrictiveness and supportiveness of immigrants.

Results:

We identified 539 state and 322 municipal laws and policies. The most common restrictive state laws and policies were in the domains of identification requirements and driver’s license access. The most common supportive state laws and policies were in the domains of health services and higher education access. The most common restrictive municipal laws and policies were in the domains of identification requirements and immigration policy enforcement. The most common supportive municipal laws and policies were in the domains of immigration policy enforcement and health services access.

Conclusion:

Most states had index scores reflecting policy environments that were primarily restrictive of immigrants, indicating potential negative impacts on social determinants of health. Further research examining the impact of these on health behaviors is warranted.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 7, Number 4, July 2020, pp. 314-324(11)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.7.4.4

2020-08-21T17:29:50-06:00August 21st, 2020|Immigration Health, Law, Open Access|

Creating Healthy Schools with Middle School Students as Change Makers

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Elaine S. Belansky, PhD Twitter
Kathleen Lohmiller, PhD
Benjamin C. Ingman, PhD
Nick Cutforth, PhD
Sharon Scarbro, MS
Laura Borley, MS

Objective:

The Working Together Project (WTP) is a classroom-based curriculum in which rural, low-income middle school students completed “Assess. Identify. Make it Happen,” a strategic planning process to improve student health by implementing evidence-based initiatives. The curriculum consisted of 30, 55-minute lessons and 28 “workdays” for students to conduct research, create communication materials, and develop presentations. Study goals were to: (1) assess the extent to which the WTP led to the implementation of evidence-based practices; and (2) describe student-level outcomes that resulted from participating in the WTP.

Methods:

We conducted a quasi-experimental, convergent mixed-methods study with 4 intervention and 2 control middle schools located in a low-income, rural region. We carried out pre/post student surveys and interviews with teachers, principals, and students.

Results:

Two of the 4 intervention schools completed the entire curriculum and implemented evidence-based practices. Students in control schools showed a decline in school connection, academic engagement, and knowledge of health problems, whereas students in the intervention arm showed increases in personal responsibility to solve problems, 21st century skills, school connectedness, and program planning skills.

Conclusion:

When implemented fully, the WTP is a promising youth-led, adult-supported strategy for implementing evidence-based practices to promote health in schools.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 7, Number 3, May 2020, pp. 260-270(11)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.7.3.10

2020-06-25T11:39:36-06:00June 20th, 2020|Adolescents, Open Access, School Health|

The Effects of School Staff Food Allergy Education in a Large Urban School District

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Atoosa Kourosh, MD, MPH Twitter
Chinelo K. Nsobundu, RN, BSN, MPH, CHES
Ritu Khosla, BDS, MPH
Danielle Guffey, MS
Charles G. Minard, PhD
Anthony J. Levinson, MD, FRCPC, MSc
Carla M. Davis, MD

Objective:

In this study, we examined program feasibility and evaluated change in staff food allergy knowledge using an online course, in-person trainings, or a combination of these in a large urban school district.

Methods:

We used online surveys to identify and gather data on target and control school staff. In Year 1, target school staff were mandated to take online training with optional in-person training; in Year 2, all staff were mandated to take online training and target school staff received additional in-person training. Changes in food allergy knowledge, epinephrine availability, and reaction recognition were measured between groups and years.

Results:

Mandatory online training improved course completion among school staff members. Pre- and post-test scores demonstrated increased food allergy knowledge in those completing the online training course. The school-based food allergy awareness program led to heightened reaction recognition and treatment in target schools that received in-person education. Target school reactions were more appropriately treated than in controls.

Conclusion:

Online training is a feasible and effective tool for food allergy awareness, but in-person skills training may help prepare staff. The heightened reaction recognition and treatment in target schools reflects improved awareness and anaphylaxis preparedness.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 7, Number 3, May 2020, pp. 238-247(10)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.7.3.8

2020-06-25T11:28:51-06:00June 20th, 2020|Food Allergy, Open Access, School Health|
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