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So far Steven Rowe has created 41 blog entries.

Examining Auxiliary Verbs in a Salient Belief Elicitation

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Julie M. Maier, PhD
Kristen N. Jozkowski, PhD
María S. Montenegro, PhD
Malachi Willis, PhD
Ronna C. Turner, PhD
Brandon L. Crawford, PhD
Wen-Juo Lo, PhD

Objective:

Salient belief elicitations (SBEs) measure beliefs toward a health behavior through open-ended questions, with the purpose of developing close-ended survey questions. Auxiliary verbs used in SBE questions often differ (eg, What are the top 3 reasons you would/should decide to have an abortion?). We tested how 2 auxiliary verbs function in a SBE assessing abortion in English and Spanish: would/decidíra and should/debería.

Methods:

We administered a SBE survey online (N = 175) and in-person (N = 72); in-person participants also participated in cognitive interviews to assess question interpretation. Participants were assigned to survey versions that included identical SBE questions aside from auxiliary verbs— would/decidíra versus should/debería. Data analysis included: (1) content analysis of survey responses to assess differences in responses by version and (2) thematic analysis of interview data focused on interpretations of would/decidíra and should/debería.

Results:

Would/decidíra surveys generated more response categories. Similarly, cognitive interview findings suggest participants conceptualized would/decidíra as allowing for more options, while should/debería was thought to include only the most significant reasons/circumstances for abortion, potentially restricting participants’ responses.

Conclusions:

These findings have important measurement implications for researchers administering SBEs.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 4, July 2021, pp. 374-393(20)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.4.9

2021-08-26T16:38:50-06:00August 26th, 2021|Hispanic/Latinx Health, Research Methods|

A Cross-sectional Survey of Chinese Secondary School Students on Infectious Disease Prevention during the COVID-19 Outbreak

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Haitian Qiu
Zhongwei Liu, PhD
Haiyun Fang, MA

Objective:

Improving secondary school students’ knowledge and behaviors toward infectious dis- ease prevention is key to promoting their health. In this study, we evaluated secondary school students’ infectious disease prevention literacy, determined the sources of knowledge acquisition, and identified deficiencies in education programs.

Methods:

A questionnaire was disseminated through social media from February 1-5, 2020, starting from selected class group chats of stu- dents in Shaanxi, Gansu, and Jiangsu provinces. A total of 1761 responses were collected. The male-to-female ratio was 1.08:1. The chi-square test was employed to analyze data.

Results:

Most respondents reported that they were familiar with the standard 7-step handwashing method. Most respondents reported that their knowledge and behaviors of infectious disease prevention were mainly acquired through the Internet. The vast majority of respondents believed that more educa- tion programs are needed in secondary schools.

Conclusions:

Secondary school students’ knowl- edge and behaviors toward infectious disease prevention need to be improved. Infectious disease prevention programs on campuses should be increased in quantity, enriched in scope, refined in form, and improved in coherence and continuity.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 4, July 2021, pp. 353-364(12)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.4.7

2021-08-26T16:32:16-06:00August 26th, 2021|COVID19, School Health|

High School Students Voice Regarding School-based Physical Activity: Perceived Barriers and Facilitating Factors

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Marie-Maude Dubuc, PhD
Seira Fortin-Suzuki, MSc
Sylvie Beaudoin, PhD
Félix Berrigan, PhD
Sylvain Turcotte, PhD

Objective:

To contribute to the development of tailored school-based physical activity interventions, in this study, we aimed to identify the perceived facilitating factors and barriers of high school students toward their physical activity in the school environment.

Methods:

A total of 139 students from 4 different high schools completed an online questionnaire comprising open-ended questions on their perceived facilitating factors and barriers toward their physical activity at school. Thereafter, 100 of these students participated in one of the 16 focus groups designed to deepen students’ responses regarding their perceived facilitating factors and barriers. Qualitative content analysis was performed to classify data according to the Social-Ecological Model.

Results:

Through questionnaires, students mostly identified intrapersonal elements as facilitating factors and barriers to their practice of physical activity, as opposed to institutional factors during the focus groups. Girls strongly valued the characteristics of the interventions and of the involved school stakeholders.

Conclusions:

Our results allow us to qualify the current understanding of high school students’ perceived facilitating factors and barriers toward school-based physical activity and strengthen the relevance of surveying students prior to the development and implementation of physical activity interventions.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 4, July 2021, pp. 331-341(11)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.4.5

2021-08-26T16:24:54-06:00August 26th, 2021|Adolescents, Physical Activity, School Health|

Perceptions and Barriers to Physical Activity in Childhood and Adulthood Among Latinas

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Rosenda Murillo, PhD
Mariana Vazquez, BA
Isabel Martinez Leal, PhD
Daphne C. Hernandez, PhD
Qian Lu, MD, PhD
Lorraine R. Reitzel, PhD

Objective:

The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify perceptions and barriers to physical activity in childhood and adulthood among Latina adults.

Methods:

We conducted 3 focus groups, 2 dyadic interviews, and an individual interview using semi-structured interview guides with 23 Latina women aged 21-35. A thematic analysis approach employing inductive and deductive coding was utilized to code, categorize, and summarize data into themes.

Results:

The themes that emerged focused on: (1) physical activity is enjoyable; (2) family influenced physical activity; (3) different lifestyle in the US influenced physical activity; (4) physical activity is important for health; and (5) responsibilities (eg, work, caregiving) as barriers to physical activity in adulthood.

Conclusions:

Perceptions and barriers to physical activity experienced in both childhood and adulthood should be considered in the promotion of physical activity among Latinas.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 4, July 2021, pp. 294-304(11)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.4.2

2021-08-26T16:18:31-06:00August 26th, 2021|Hispanic/Latinx Health, Physical Activity|

Drug Story Theater: A Mixed-Methods Study of a Peer-to-Peer Approach to Substance Abuse Education

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Joseph Shrand, MD Twitter
Madeline DiGiovanni, BS
Dana Lee, BS
Anita Kishore, MD
Andrés Martin, MD, MPH

Objective:

Drug Story Theater (DST) is a peer-to-peer intervention that engages teenagers in the early stages of their recovery to develop shows about the seduction of, addiction to, and recovery from drugs and alcohol.

Methods:

We analyzed anonymous surveys completed by students before and after attending a DST performance, and transcripts of focus group interviews conducted with (1) program developers, (2) stakeholders, (3) performers, and (4) audience members.

Results:

Students (N = 871) from 5 schools attended one of 2 DST performances. Participants demonstrated increased knowledge on 5 fact-based questions (mean improvement range, 19%- 35%; p < .001 for all), and favorable changes on 10 items addressing perceptions regarding substance use risk (paired t test range, 3.9-9.4; p < .001 for all). Through iterative thematic analysis we developed an alliterative “7P” model spanning 2 domains: (1) Participants (Performers and Peers); and (2) Program (Partnerships, Practicalities, and Prevention).

Conclusions:

Exposure to a DST performance improved knowledge and risk perceptions about addiction among middle and high school students. It remains to be seen if those changes can have an effect on the prevention of substance use and dependence among vulnerable youth, and whether the active components of DST can be replicated in other school environments.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 4, July 2021, pp. 281-293(13)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.4.1

2021-08-26T16:09:29-06:00August 26th, 2021|Adolescents, School Health, Substance Use|

Time to Scale-up Research Collaborations to Address the Global Impact of COVID-19 – A Commentary

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Authors:

Annie Lu Nguyen, PhD, MPH Twitter
Brandon Brown, PhD, MPH
Maha El Tantawi, PhD
Nicaise Ndembi, PhD
Joseph Okeibunor, PhD
Abdulaziz Mohammed, MD
Morenike Oluwatoyin Folayan, DMD

Objective:

In this commentary, we suggest that the unprecedented global impact of the COVID-19 pandemic provides a compelling reason for researchers to stretch beyond usual limits and find new ways to engage in global collaborations.

Methods:

We point to data that have emerged on the mental health and economic consequences of the pandemic to illustrate the extent to which these common issues cross national borders. There is high likelihood that these burdens will continue to persist long after the pandemic is declared “over.”

Results:

We urge researchers, particularly those from countries with higher income economies, to share resources to increase international collaborative research efforts. We present a case study of an ongoing project and offer some lessons learned for individual investigators.

Conclusions:

Global problems require global solutions. The COVID-19 pandemic is a global crisis that should prompt researchers to engage in science and research across national borders.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 3, May 2021, pp. 277-280(4)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.3.9

2021-06-30T21:28:53-06:00June 30th, 2021|COVID19, Research Methods|

Supporting a Participatory Process for Evidence on Healthy Eating to Promote Healthy Diet among Children: An Illustration from Nigeria

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Authors:

Yetunde O. John-Akinola, MPH, PhD
Odunayo O. Akano, MPH
Oluwasegun Akinwale, MPH

Objective:

In this study, we assessed children’s perception of healthy eating and investigated the contents of lunch boxes packed from home.

Methods:

Overall, 728 pupils in first to sixth class across 25 primary schools in Ibadan, South West Nigeria wrote their perceptions of healthy eating on small colored papers. Contents of lunch boxes were observed during the school lunch period. Descriptive and qualitative analysis was carried out and data were represented in word clouds and figures.

Results:

Most pupils (97.9%) listed food items that they referred to as healthy food, represented in a word cloud. Further categorization showed that few pupils identified fruits (5.3%) and vegetables (2.4%) as healthy food. Pupils in private schools were 1.9 times more likely to have pastries in their lunch boxes than public schools (OR = 1.914, 95% CI: 1.121-3.268)

Conclusions:

Multiple educational interventions should be targeted at the pupil-, parent-, and school-level to promote healthy eating behaviors. The use of communication materials with pictorial depiction of examples of healthy food could serve as a reinforcing factor to help maintain positive behavioral change.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 3, May 2021, pp. 269-276(8)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.3.8

2021-06-30T21:28:00-06:00June 30th, 2021|Community Health, Nutrition|

Collaboration, Training and Resources to Support School Policy Development and Recovery from Concussion

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Authors:

Karen Sadler, MCP
Kate Turcotte, MSc
Shelina Babul, PhD

Objective:

Concussion is a public health concern across all ages, yet there is little research on providing concussion education and training within the educational context. The Concussion Awareness Training Tool for School Professionals (CATT SP) was developed to provide the necessary concussion education and resources for school professionals to support a student with concussion while integrating back to school.

Methods:

The CATT SP module underwent a 2016 pre/post-intervention evaluation to determine if knowledge and attitudes significantly improved among educators and administrators following completion of the CATT SP, as well as a 2018-19 pilot study within a school district in British Columbia with an accompanying Quality Assurance/Quality Improvement assessment.

Results:

A statistically significant positive change in knowledge (p = .027) was found among those who indicated that they had accessed CATT SP. Results of the pilot study and QA/QI assessment found support of the use of CATT within the school district.

Conclusions:

Evidence-based concussion training and resources are key components for school professionals who are collaboratively supporting a student’s individualized return to school and learning following a concussion, and when developing and implementing a concussion policy within districts and school.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 3, May 2021, pp. 257-268(12)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.3.7

2021-06-30T21:27:06-06:00June 30th, 2021|Health Policy, Program Planning|

Children’s Physical Activity and Screen Time during COVID-19 Pandemic: A Qualitative Exploration of Parent Perceptions

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Authors:

Amy A. Eyler, PhD CHES
Laurel Schmidt, BS
Alan Beck, PhD, CHES
Amanda Gilbert, MPH
Maura Kepper, PhD
Stephanie Mazzucca, PhD

Objective:

In this study, we explore parent perception of children’s physical activity and screen time during COVID-19 stay-at-home orders.

Methods:

We interviewed 16 parents of children ages 5-12 years in the St. Louis, Missouri region using snowball sampling. We sampled from rural, urban, and suburban areas. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using a priori and emergent codes.

Results:

The transition to virtual school and work transformed daily activities. Physical education requirements varied, generally perceived as not contributing to overall physical activity. Parents perceived the amount of physical activity as the same or increased but reported an increase in screen time. The physical environment of the home, yard, and neighborhood emerged as a theme as did the social environment for physical activity.

Conclusions:

COVID-19 stay-at-home orders created challenges for children’s physical activity. Results can be used to inform more generalizable studies and serve as a basis for creating better parent resources to support their children’s physical activity outside of ordinary school, sport, and community activity opportunities.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 3, May 2021, pp. 236-246(11)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.3.5

2021-06-30T21:25:19-06:00June 30th, 2021|COVID19, Physical Activity|

Single and Multi-message Sexuality Education: Improving Implementation and Evaluation of Group-based Programs

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Authors:

Lisa A. Rue, PhD
Michael A. Floren, PhD
Kiley M. Floren, MPH
Galena K. Rhoades, PhD
Kayla Knopp, PhD
Elaine M. Walker, PhD
Jesse Owen, PhD

Objective:

In this study, we isolated primary messaging strategies of sexuality education curricula to improve tailored delivery of group-based interventions. Specifically, our aim was to define single-message programs (eg, messaging about avoiding sexual risk or messaging about reducing sexual risk) and multiple-message programs (eg, avoiding sexual risk and reducing sexual risk), and to investigate their comparative effectiveness.

Methods:

We used a descriptive approach with publicly available data from US Department of Health and Human Services-funded teen pregnancy prevention programs to categorize 16 different curricula as single-message or multiple-message. We coded primary messages using a curriculum mapping rubric and scoring that was evaluated by a panel of experts for content validity. Forest plots compared behavioral outcomes.

Results:

Scores for primary messages achieved inter-rater reliability of 91%-100%; curricula were scored on 20 items within each category to calculate mean scores. Spearman correlations for items ranged from .43 to .93.

Conclusions:

No outcome differences were observed between single- or multi-message programs. Effective delivery of primary messaging may rely more on identifying moderators of classroom climate typically underrepresented in evaluations of school-based programs.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 3, May 2021, pp. 223-235(13)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.3.4

2021-06-30T21:24:23-06:00June 30th, 2021|Interventions, Sexual Health|
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