The Impact of COVID-19 on Pre-K-12 Students and Staff in a Mid-sized Metropolitan Area

View Full Article

An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Paul R. Teran, MD
Julia Kononowicz, MD
Stephanie Kuhlmann, DO
Julian Dedeaux, PhD
Kari Harris, MD

Objective:

During fall 2020, schools used a variety of learning modes based on anticipated risk of viral transmission within schools.

Methods:

De-identified SARS-CoV-2 data from 11 school districts in the Wichita, Kansas metropolitan area from August 1 to November 15, 2020, was collated for analysis. The Sedgwick County Health Department (SCHD) and Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) databases were accessed for community-level and contact tracing data.

Results:

Altogether, 13,573 staff and 54,479 students receiving full or partial on-site (hybrid) education were included. Few students (1.4%) or staff (4.7%) tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. District rates varied from 0.1% to 3.3% in students and 0.7% to 8.7% in staff. Students in grades 9-12 had a higher rate of positive tests and cases were more likely linked to school-based exposure. Staff rate by grade level did not show an identifiable trend; staff rates were higher in non-attendance centers.

Conclusions:

Low SARS-CoV-2 student case rates suggests on-site learning formats may be appropriate. School trends reflected community rate reinforcing that community-level interventions are necessary to decrease transmission. As new variants arise, transmission characteristics must be studied. Health and education partnership is important to ensure the greatest well-being for students and staff.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 6, November 2021, pp. 575-584(10)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.6.8

2021-12-30T21:40:08-07:00December 30th, 2021|COVID19, School Health|

Effective Elements of School-based Provision for the Promotion of Healthy Lifestyles: A European Delphi Study

View Full Article

An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Richard Bailey, PhD
Iva Glibo, MSc
Claude Scheuer, PhD Twitter

Objective:

Schools can serve as settings for promoting their student health, although it is necessary to identify the key elements of provision to leverage change. This study’s objective was to develop a Europe-based list of the elements of learning and health support systems judged by a group of experts to be most effective in influencing school student healthy lifestyles education.

Methods:

A 3-stage Delphi study involving a group of 18 Europe-based subject specialists was used to articulate shared expert opinions on the main research question: what are the most effective elements of learning and health support systems influencing school students’ healthy lifestyles education? Over 3 rounds of data-gathering, experts were asked to assess the effectiveness of 25 specific elements.

Results:

The 3 rounds resulted in the following ranked list: Physical Education (PE), Staff Professional Development, Healthy School Policies, Active Recess, Family & Community Engagement, Healthy Eating, Physical Activity in Classroom Lessons, and Active Transport.

Conclusions:

Cautious of overly generalizing from the results, we suggest the findings offer useful information for evidence-based programs, as well as future research that explores the necessary components of health promotion in schools.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 6, November 2021, pp. 546-557(12)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.6.5

2021-12-30T21:35:45-07:00December 30th, 2021|Lifestyle, School Health|

Hallways to Health: School Health Beyond School-Based Health Center Walls

View Full Article

An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Sara Geierstanger, MPH
Jordanna Snyder, MPH, CHES Twitter
Hayley Love, PhD, MSc
Andrea Shore, MPH
John Schlitt, MSW

Objective:

In this paper, we describe the implementation and outcomes of an initiative that engaged school-based health centers (SBHCs) in a learning community to create programmatic and policy school health changes beyond the health center walls.

Methods:

Sixty respondents completed impact surveys and 13 coalitions completed progress reports to document schoolwide wellness efforts and outcomes in stakeholder engagement, student healthy eating and active living, student social and emotional wellness, and school staff wellness.

Results:

Respondents reported pre- to post-intervention improvements in stakeholder engagement, including school administration promotion of school health policies (from 64% to 95%), and teacher participation in SBHC sponsored activities (from 63% to 98%). They reported schoolwide policy and programmatic achievements including increased opportunities for physical activity for students during school hours (from 55% to 85%), access to behavioral health counseling and support services to all students, either on-site or through referrals (from 62% to 89%), and offering healthy food or nutrition education to staff (from 10% to 73%).

Conclusions:

SBHC staff, school employees, and community members can work collaboratively to assess student physical and mental health needs, and develop and implement school policies and programs beyond the clinic walls.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 6, November 2021, pp. 503-513(11)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.6.2

2021-12-30T21:34:00-07:00December 30th, 2021|Implementation, Program Planning, School Health|

Supporting Mental Health in School Settings: Findings from a Qualitative Evaluation

View Full Article
An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Linda Weiss, PhD
Marilyn Jacob, PhD, LCSW
Maya Scherer, MPH
Anna Borkina, MS

Objective:

In this paper, we describe results from stakeholder interviews conducted to assess implementation and perceived outcomes of a project, implemented in 92 New York City middle and high schools, and focused on building the mental health-related skills of school personnel and promotion of healthier school environments.

Methods:

As part of a mixed-methods evaluation, we conducted 59 key stakeholder interviews with staff of participating community-based organizations and schools. Interview topics included mental health needs, project activities, engagement by school staff, strengths and challenges of the initiative, and perceived impact.

Results:

At the start of the project, interviewees reported difficulty comprehending the model and accepting its utility, given the direct service needs of students. Although concerns remained, we found positive impact, including increased awareness of mental health issues and their root causes, a greater sensitivity to students’ social and emotional challenges, and improved capacity to manage behavioral issues in the classroom.

Conclusions:

Although targeted approaches are needed for high-risk youth, population-level approaches may increase mental health knowledge and skills and support transformation leading to healthier school environments.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 5, September 2021, pp. 429-437(9)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.5.4

2021-10-27T18:54:25-06:00October 27th, 2021|Mental Health, School Health|

Face Mask Policies of US Public School Districts in States without Statewide Mandates

View Full Article
An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Philip Jacobs, PhD
Arvi Ohinmaa

Objective:

We developed categories of the degree of restrictiveness of public schoolboards’ face mask policies in 10 US states that had no statewide mask mandates at any time during the COVID-19 pandemic. We collected data on schoolboards’ mask wearing policies for the individual boards in these states.

Methods:

We obtained school reopening plans found on school district webpages. We abstracted district mask policies and sorted them into groups indicating whether mask wearing was required or recommended.

Results:

Overall, 44% of boards mandated masks in school settings. There was a wide variation of policies within and between states.

Conclusions:

When left to their own resources, schoolboards will follow a variety of policies, many of which are a departure from state recommendations.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 5, September 2021, pp. 422-428(7)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.5.3

2021-10-27T17:15:38-06:00October 27th, 2021|COVID19, School Health|

Implementing Statewide Health Surveillance in Schools: Processes and Lessons Learned from the Texas SPAN Project

View Full Article
An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Katherine A. Elder, PhD, MPAff
Carolyn Smith, BS
Claire Niday, MPH
Alison Winters Massie, DrPH
Amanda M. Reat, PhD, RD
Amier Haidar, BS
Michelle L. Cook, PhD, MPH
Deanna M. Hoelscher, PhD, RDN, LD, CNS, FISBNPA

Objective:

Prevalence of obesity among youth has increased in the last several decades. Using schools as a place to collect data on childhood obesity is considered by many researchers to be an important component to combating the disease. In this paper, we present process data from the Texas School Physical Activity and Nutrition (SPAN) project, a statewide surveillance system to monitor the prevalence of Texas school-aged children who have overweight/obesity.

Methods:

We selected 3 Public Health Regions (PHRs), including 30 districts and 140 schools, to represent geographic variability of processes of conducting this surveillance system. We tracked and analyzed administrative and communicative processes to conduct the Texas SPAN in those districts/schools.

Results:

The results demonstrate significant procedural variability across and within PHRs in implementing Texas SPAN. These variations occurred and are presented at both the district and school levels and relate to parental consent, communication processes, and time lags involved in approval and measurement.

Conclusions:

Due to the variability in the process data observed across and within PHRs, we recommend researchers interested in establishing obesity surveillance systems work to create statewide and local partnerships, cultivate strong communication, and develop mechanisms for data management.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 5, September 2021, pp. 412-421(10)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.5.2

2021-10-27T17:09:44-06:00October 27th, 2021|Community Health, School Health|

A Cross-sectional Survey of Chinese Secondary School Students on Infectious Disease Prevention during the COVID-19 Outbreak

View Full Article
An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Haitian Qiu
Zhongwei Liu, PhD
Haiyun Fang, MA

Objective:

Improving secondary school students’ knowledge and behaviors toward infectious dis- ease prevention is key to promoting their health. In this study, we evaluated secondary school students’ infectious disease prevention literacy, determined the sources of knowledge acquisition, and identified deficiencies in education programs.

Methods:

A questionnaire was disseminated through social media from February 1-5, 2020, starting from selected class group chats of stu- dents in Shaanxi, Gansu, and Jiangsu provinces. A total of 1761 responses were collected. The male-to-female ratio was 1.08:1. The chi-square test was employed to analyze data.

Results:

Most respondents reported that they were familiar with the standard 7-step handwashing method. Most respondents reported that their knowledge and behaviors of infectious disease prevention were mainly acquired through the Internet. The vast majority of respondents believed that more educa- tion programs are needed in secondary schools.

Conclusions:

Secondary school students’ knowl- edge and behaviors toward infectious disease prevention need to be improved. Infectious disease prevention programs on campuses should be increased in quantity, enriched in scope, refined in form, and improved in coherence and continuity.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 4, July 2021, pp. 353-364(12)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.4.7

2021-08-26T16:32:16-06:00August 26th, 2021|COVID19, School Health|

High School Students Voice Regarding School-based Physical Activity: Perceived Barriers and Facilitating Factors

View Full Article
An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Marie-Maude Dubuc, PhD
Seira Fortin-Suzuki, MSc
Sylvie Beaudoin, PhD
Félix Berrigan, PhD
Sylvain Turcotte, PhD

Objective:

To contribute to the development of tailored school-based physical activity interventions, in this study, we aimed to identify the perceived facilitating factors and barriers of high school students toward their physical activity in the school environment.

Methods:

A total of 139 students from 4 different high schools completed an online questionnaire comprising open-ended questions on their perceived facilitating factors and barriers toward their physical activity at school. Thereafter, 100 of these students participated in one of the 16 focus groups designed to deepen students’ responses regarding their perceived facilitating factors and barriers. Qualitative content analysis was performed to classify data according to the Social-Ecological Model.

Results:

Through questionnaires, students mostly identified intrapersonal elements as facilitating factors and barriers to their practice of physical activity, as opposed to institutional factors during the focus groups. Girls strongly valued the characteristics of the interventions and of the involved school stakeholders.

Conclusions:

Our results allow us to qualify the current understanding of high school students’ perceived facilitating factors and barriers toward school-based physical activity and strengthen the relevance of surveying students prior to the development and implementation of physical activity interventions.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 4, July 2021, pp. 331-341(11)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.4.5

2021-08-26T16:24:54-06:00August 26th, 2021|Adolescents, Physical Activity, School Health|

Drug Story Theater: A Mixed-Methods Study of a Peer-to-Peer Approach to Substance Abuse Education

View Full Article
An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Joseph Shrand, MD Twitter
Madeline DiGiovanni, BS
Dana Lee, BS
Anita Kishore, MD
Andrés Martin, MD, MPH

Objective:

Drug Story Theater (DST) is a peer-to-peer intervention that engages teenagers in the early stages of their recovery to develop shows about the seduction of, addiction to, and recovery from drugs and alcohol.

Methods:

We analyzed anonymous surveys completed by students before and after attending a DST performance, and transcripts of focus group interviews conducted with (1) program developers, (2) stakeholders, (3) performers, and (4) audience members.

Results:

Students (N = 871) from 5 schools attended one of 2 DST performances. Participants demonstrated increased knowledge on 5 fact-based questions (mean improvement range, 19%- 35%; p < .001 for all), and favorable changes on 10 items addressing perceptions regarding substance use risk (paired t test range, 3.9-9.4; p < .001 for all). Through iterative thematic analysis we developed an alliterative “7P” model spanning 2 domains: (1) Participants (Performers and Peers); and (2) Program (Partnerships, Practicalities, and Prevention).

Conclusions:

Exposure to a DST performance improved knowledge and risk perceptions about addiction among middle and high school students. It remains to be seen if those changes can have an effect on the prevention of substance use and dependence among vulnerable youth, and whether the active components of DST can be replicated in other school environments.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 4, July 2021, pp. 281-293(13)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.4.1

2021-08-26T16:09:29-06:00August 26th, 2021|Adolescents, School Health, Substance Use|

Can Eating Food Offered by Schools Have a Positive Influence on Nutritional Status of Children? An Example from Brazil

View Full Article

Authors:

Daniel H. Bandoni, PhD Twitter
Daniela S. Canella, PhD Twitter

Objective:

Considering that the school environment can impact food consumption and children’s weight, our aim was to evaluate the relationship between the origin of foods consumed at school and children’s nutritional status.

Methods:

We used data from the nationally representative Brazilian Household Budget Survey of children under 10 years old. The relationship between consumption of foods at school and its origin (offered by the school; taken from home; bought at the canteens) and nutritional status were evaluated using linear (BMI-for-age) and logistic (excess weight and obesity) regression models stratified by type of school (private or public).

Results:

A total of 95.5% of children referred consumption of food at school, independent of its origin, and 28.0% had excess weight and 10.2% had obesity. In private schools, 70.7% of children ate food taken from home, whereas in public schools, 90.6% of children ate food offered by the school through a school food service program. According to adjusted analyses related to public schools, consuming food offered by the school decreased BMI-for-age and the odds of having obesity. No differences were verified among children from private schools.

Conclusions:

Eating food offered by public schools seems to be better for Brazilian children’s nutritional status.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 3, May 2021, pp. 202-211(10)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.3.2

2021-06-30T23:16:36-06:00June 30th, 2021|Nutrition, School Health|
Go to Top