Evaluating School Profiles to Determine Risk for Teen Suicide

View Full Article

An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Nancy Eigel-Miller, MS
Lisa M. Vaughn, PhD
Michael Topmiller, PhD
Olga Semanova, MS
Jonelle Prideaux, BA
Kamali Bouvay, MD
Cheryl Hilvert, MA, LPCC
Erica Page, PhD

Objective:

In this study, we examined characteristics and school contexts to identify profiles of schools at highest risk for suicide in Cincinnati, Ohio and the surrounding geographic area.

Methods:

We conducted a retrospective cohort study supplemented by context analysis. Adolescent data included total psychiatric-related pediatric emergency department encounters, psychiatric-related inpatient admissions, and suicide encounters/admissions aggregated to school level. School factors included type, size, geographic location, academic rigor, existence of a mental health partner, and culture of suicide prevention efforts at the school.

Results:

Using a k-means cluster analysis, 173 schools were sorted into 4 distinct clusters based on based on patient data linked to schools. A context analysis of the 25 highest risk schools revealed general patterns of low academic achievement measures, limited mental health partnership, and poor suicide prevention ratings.

Conclusions:

These findings suggest that schools which already reflect limited access to resources are the same ones disparately at higher risk for suicide in our geographic area. The variation of at- risk suicidality factors across schools suggests the need for tailored suicide prevention interventions specific to school characteristics and context.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 9, Number 2, March 2022, pp. 738-750(13)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.9.2.2

2022-03-30T22:07:38-06:00March 30th, 2022|Adolescents, Mental Health|

Supporting Mental Health in School Settings: Findings from a Qualitative Evaluation

View Full Article
An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Linda Weiss, PhD
Marilyn Jacob, PhD, LCSW
Maya Scherer, MPH
Anna Borkina, MS

Objective:

In this paper, we describe results from stakeholder interviews conducted to assess implementation and perceived outcomes of a project, implemented in 92 New York City middle and high schools, and focused on building the mental health-related skills of school personnel and promotion of healthier school environments.

Methods:

As part of a mixed-methods evaluation, we conducted 59 key stakeholder interviews with staff of participating community-based organizations and schools. Interview topics included mental health needs, project activities, engagement by school staff, strengths and challenges of the initiative, and perceived impact.

Results:

At the start of the project, interviewees reported difficulty comprehending the model and accepting its utility, given the direct service needs of students. Although concerns remained, we found positive impact, including increased awareness of mental health issues and their root causes, a greater sensitivity to students’ social and emotional challenges, and improved capacity to manage behavioral issues in the classroom.

Conclusions:

Although targeted approaches are needed for high-risk youth, population-level approaches may increase mental health knowledge and skills and support transformation leading to healthier school environments.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 5, September 2021, pp. 429-437(9)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.5.4

2021-10-27T18:54:25-06:00October 27th, 2021|Mental Health, School Health|
Go to Top