Interventions

Effect of Emotional Distress Monitoring and Intervention in Preventing Non-suicidal Self-injury (NSSI) of College Students

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Chunrong Chen, MPH, CHES
Xianrong Li, MS
Yu Deng, MPH, CHES

Objective:

In this study, we monitored and intervened in the emotional status of college students to understand the effect of intervention measures on the prevention and control of non-suicidal self-harm, and to provide a reference for the prevention and control of self-harm in college students.

Methods:

We conducted a baseline survey of 1832 first-year students across 3 vocational colleges in Chongqing, China in October 2019. In October 2020, we followed-up regarding the non- suicidal self-injury (NSSI) occurrences among our original respondents. During the year, students’ emotions were regularly monitored. The students who scored > 10 and had moderate suicidal thoughts were provided counseling to reduce their emotional stress. If the students could not reduce these emotions, their counselors contacted the school psychological center for professional counseling. If the school psychological counseling center diagnosed the students with severe depression, the counselors informed their parents and suggested hospital treatment.

Results:

The detection rate of NSSI history was 18.52% (320/1728), and the detection rate of the follow-up survey was 8.13% (137/1685); the difference in the detection rate was statistically significant (X2 = 128.3103, p < .001).

Conclusions:

Our results show that monitoring and intervening in college students’ emotional states can prevent the occurrence of NSSI behavior.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 9, Number 3, May 2022, pp. 846-852(7)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.9.3.2

2022-06-11T16:17:57-06:00June 11th, 2022|College Health, Interventions, Mental Health|

Single and Multi-message Sexuality Education: Improving Implementation and Evaluation of Group-based Programs

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Authors:

Lisa A. Rue, PhD
Michael A. Floren, PhD
Kiley M. Floren, MPH
Galena K. Rhoades, PhD
Kayla Knopp, PhD
Elaine M. Walker, PhD
Jesse Owen, PhD

Objective:

In this study, we isolated primary messaging strategies of sexuality education curricula to improve tailored delivery of group-based interventions. Specifically, our aim was to define single-message programs (eg, messaging about avoiding sexual risk or messaging about reducing sexual risk) and multiple-message programs (eg, avoiding sexual risk and reducing sexual risk), and to investigate their comparative effectiveness.

Methods:

We used a descriptive approach with publicly available data from US Department of Health and Human Services-funded teen pregnancy prevention programs to categorize 16 different curricula as single-message or multiple-message. We coded primary messages using a curriculum mapping rubric and scoring that was evaluated by a panel of experts for content validity. Forest plots compared behavioral outcomes.

Results:

Scores for primary messages achieved inter-rater reliability of 91%-100%; curricula were scored on 20 items within each category to calculate mean scores. Spearman correlations for items ranged from .43 to .93.

Conclusions:

No outcome differences were observed between single- or multi-message programs. Effective delivery of primary messaging may rely more on identifying moderators of classroom climate typically underrepresented in evaluations of school-based programs.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 3, May 2021, pp. 223-235(13)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.3.4

2021-06-30T21:24:23-06:00June 30th, 2021|Interventions, Sexual Health|
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