Healthy People 2030

Associations among Eating Habits, Health Conditions, and Education Level in North Dakota Adults

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Authors:

Amir Alakaam, PhD, RDN, LDN, MBChB
Madeline Lett, MPH, BSN
Hailey Puckett, MPH
Katherine Kite, BSPS

Objective:

Many socioeconomic factors can influence the consumption of a nutritious diet. To uncover factors influencing nutrition habits in North Dakota, we implemented a community-based nutrition education program.

Methods:

The program consisted of 6 educational sessions at a farmer’s market in North Dakota. We collected data through a questionnaire to assess individuals’ demographic information, health conditions, fruit and vegetable intake, and nutrition knowledge (N = 290). We analyzed the data using descriptive, chi-square, and one-way ANOVA analysis.

Results:

Overall, 37% of participants had a 4-year college degree, 20% had a master’s degree, 18% had a high school degree, and 17% had a 2-year or vocational degree. The chi-square analysis indicated a statistically significant correlation between education level and health condition (p = .010) and average total fruit and vegetable intake (p = .020). Participants with a higher level of education had fewer chronic disease diagnoses and ate more fruits and vegetables. The one-way ANOVA indicated a statistically significant relationship between education and nutrition knowledge (p < .001).

Conclusions:

Individuals with higher nutrition knowledge may have healthier eating habits and better health outcomes. Future nutrition education programs are needed to improve health equity and the population’s overall eating habits.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 9, Number 1, January 2022, pp. 636-644(9)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.9.1.2

2022-02-02T11:18:21-07:00February 1st, 2022|Free, Healthy People 2030|

College-level Personal Health Courses: A Perspective for Improving Their Relevance and Reducing Health Disparities in the US

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Philip Jacobs, PhD
Arvi Ohinmaa

Objective:

In this paper, we explore how the relevance of college-level personal health courses could be enhanced and how these courses could be leveraged for improving student health and providing access to information useful in reducing health disparities and improving overall health in adulthood.

Methods:

We examine and interpret literature on college student health and the content and delivery of personal health courses.

Results:

College-level personal health courses occur in many different academic units and through numerous delivery modes. College students’ ability to access and use health information may be a social determinant of health later in life. Whereas specific course content varies, it underperforms in relevance to students’ lives. Specific areas needing improvement are mental health, interpersonal relationships, food selection and preparation on a budget, harm reduction with respect to alcohol use, and other areas that currently receive insufficient attention.

Conclusions:

Personal health courses may have the potential to reduce health disparities if access to college and relevant health-related information can be operationalized better. Motivated by the impact on collegiate life by the COVID-19 pandemic, we recommend research that leads to reform of college-level personal health courses responsive to student interests and delivery mechanisms that enhance motivation to learn, and result in reduced susceptibility to chronic diseases and improved adult health and quality of life.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 9, Number 1, January 2022, pp. 645-659(15)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.9.1.3

2022-02-04T11:27:25-07:00February 1st, 2022|College Health, Health Education, Healthy People 2030|
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