Cervical Cancer Knowledge as a Predictor of Latent Class Membership among African American and Hispanic Young Adult College Women

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Authors:

Chakema Carmack, PhD
Karina Serrano, BSH
Angelica Roncancio, PhD

Background:

Multiple studies have shown that African-American and Hispanic women have limited and inadequate knowledge about cervical cancer (CC) and CC screening, which contributes to morbidity and mortality disparities. Access to knowledge, education, and other socio-political factors are social determinants of health that serve to shape individual health behavior knowledge. Better CC knowledge has been shown to increase screening uptake.

Methods:

In the present study, we specified unique subgroups regarding CC prevention behaviors in a sample of African-American and Hispanic women (N = 328) recruited from a minority-serving higher education institution.

Results:

Latent class analysis identified 3 unique salient subgroups based on the indicators: CC Screening Adherers and Vaccinators (14%), CC Screening Adherers (48%), and CC Prevention Non-adherers (38%). We found probable variations within the classes regarding screening behavior, human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination status, and race/ethnicity. Women reporting higher guideline knowledge were 11 times more likely to be classified as CC Screening Adherers
and Vaccinators
than CC Prevention Non-adherers. Additionally, women who specifically understood that HPV causes cervical cancer were 16 and 9 times more likely to be classified as CC Screening Adherers and Vaccinators and CC Screening Adherers than to be classified as CC Prevention Non-adherers.

Conclusions:

Addressing cervical cancer knowledge remains an important intervention strategy in these populations to increase CC screening uptake.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 9, Number 1, January 2022, pp. 707-718(12)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: hhttps://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.9.1.8

2022-02-02T11:24:17-07:00February 1st, 2022|Free, Healthy People 2030|

Parent Perceptions of the Benefits of Sport Participation: A Mixed-methods Approach

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Authors:

Karissa L. Peyer, PhD
Ora LaShay Smith, MPH

Objective:

Objective PA-12 of Healthy People 2030 is focused on an increase in sport participation among youth. Organized leisure-time sport participation (OLSP) can be a valuable source of physical activity for children and adolescents. The ability of programs to provide important benefits to children may play a role in parent decisions to enroll their child in these programs.

Methods:

In the present study, we gathered demographics, sport participation, and parent-reported (N = 452) benefits of sport participation as part of a survey investigating OLSP behaviors.

Results:

We found no differences in sport participation by sex or race/ethnicity. However, children from lower income homes were less likely to participate in sport than those from higher income homes (p < .001). Health and exercise, socialization, teamwork, and leadership skill development were the most common benefits reported by parents. Other benefits included practice/skill building/self-esteem, fun, reduced screen time, exposure to a role model, stress relief, and recognition.

Conclusions:

These benefits should be emphasized in OLSP programs and used for marketing and promotion to increase participation in OLSP to achieve objective PA-12.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 9, Number 1, January 2022, pp. 697-706(10)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.9.1.7

2022-02-02T11:23:10-07:00February 1st, 2022|Free, Healthy People 2030|

Strategies for Success: Parent Perspectives on School-based Vision Programs

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Authors:

Madison Wahl, BA
Hursuong Vongsachang, BA, MPH
Alyssa M. Kretz, BA
Jonathan Callan, MD
Amanda Neitzel, PhD Twitter
M. Rani Mukherjee, BA
David S. Friedman, MD, PhD, MPH
Megan E. Collins, MD, MPH Twitter

Objective:

School-based vision programs (SBVPs) connect children to eyecare directly in schools with benefits for vision and academics. Whereas parental engagement is critical to SBVP success, research on parent perspectives is lacking. We report on parental suggestions about how to maximize the impact of SBVPs.

Methods:

Data were collected from 20 parent focus groups (90 participants) in Baltimore, MD and Chicago, IL. Focus groups were recorded, audio-transcribed, and coded using inductive thematic analysis.

Results:

Major themes of parental suggestions for maximizing SBVP impact were: (1) communication, (2) education, and (3) eyeglass resources. Flyers and phone calls were the most frequently suggested methods for communication. Parents requested education regarding screening outcome, instructions for eyeglass use, and eyecare recommendations. Parents also suggested eyeglass resources to assist in maintenance and multiple pairs of eyeglasses.

Conclusions:

This information provides a framework about what parents want to know about SBVPs and opportunities to strengthen program-parent engagement. This framework can support the mission of increasing early childhood vision screening and reducing vision loss in children and adolescents as set forth by Healthy People 2030.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 9, Number 1, January 2022, pp. 683-696(14)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.9.1.6

2022-02-02T11:22:02-07:00February 1st, 2022|Free, Healthy People 2030|

Qualitative Perceptions of an Anticipated Fresh Food Prescription Program

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Authors:

Sharon Thomson, BS
Judy Ugwuegbu, PharmD Twitter
Kimberly Montez, MD, MPH Twitter
Sarah Langdon, MPH, MCHES
Scott Best, MBA Twitter
Daniel Sostaita, BA, MDiv
Michelle Franklin, RN, PhD Twitter
Rachel Zimmer, RN, DNP, AGPCNP-C Twitter

Objective:

Food insecurity (FI) is a growing public health problem. Produce prescriptions are known to improve healthy eating and decrease FI; however, few studies have incorporated community voice prior to its implementation. In this study, we aimed to elicit perspectives of individuals at risk for FI and the potential impact of a fresh food prescription (FFRx) program.

Methods:

We conducted this qualitative descriptive study through an academic medical center in collaboration with community partners. We conducted focus groups involving Latinx (N = 16) and African-American (N = 8) adults in community settings. Data were interpreted using an inductive thematic analysis.

Results:

Three overarching themes emerged: (1) fresh food accessibility was limited by cost, house-hold size, and transportation but enhanced by food pantries, budgeting, and education; (2) cooking behaviors were curbed by time constraints and unfamiliarity but propagated by passion, traditions, and communal practices; and (3) health and wellness deterrents included unhealthy diets driven by cultural and familial norms; however, weight loss and awareness of comorbidities were positive motivators. Participants shared their preference for local produce and cooking classes as components of a FFRx program while raising concerns about low participation due to the stigma of receiving aid.

Conclusions:

Our findings illuminated interest in engaging in a FFRx program and learning ways to prepare healthy foods. A program distributing fresh produce and healthy lifestyle education could close gaps identified in African-American and Latinx communities at risk for FI.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 9, Number 1, January 2022, pp. 670-682(13)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.9.1.5

2022-02-02T11:20:44-07:00February 1st, 2022|Free, Healthy People 2030|

Nutrition Label Literacy and Food Choices among Mobile Food Pantry Participants

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Authors:

Shadai Martin, PhD, RDN
Leia Zagone, MS
Stephanie Rogus PhD, RDN

Objective:

We assessed nutrition label literacy and whether the implementation of traffic light labeling (TLL) would facilitate participants’ perceptions about the usefulness of TLL in making healthier food choices at a university’s mobile food pantry.

Methods:

TLL was implemented during 3 mobile food pantry distribution sessions on a university campus in the southwestern United States during spring of 2020. College students, staff, and community members utilizing the mobile food pantry selected food items based on the TLL perceptions after receiving nutrition education. We used items from validated surveys, demographic items, and TLL perception questions to collect our data from participants (N = 112).

Results:

We found statistically significant associations between nutrition label literacy and choosing healthier food items based on TLL perceptions; participants who had lower nutrition label literacy scores perceived the TLL to be the most helpful in selecting healthier food items (p = .02). Statistically significant association also was noted between race/ethnicity and nutrition label literacy (p = .004) and overweight participants perceiving the TLL method to be restrictive when choosing food items(p = .02).

Conclusions:

Assessing nutrition label literacy and whether the implementation of the TLL would facilitate participants perceptions about the usefulness of the TLL in making healthier food choices identifies opportunities to improve nutrition label literacy among individuals who utilize mobile food pantries; in addition, it highlights the importance of nutrition label literacy in making informed and/or healthy food choices.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 9, Number 1, January 2022, pp. 660-669(10)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.9.1.4

2022-02-02T11:19:19-07:00February 1st, 2022|Free, Healthy People 2030|

Associations among Eating Habits, Health Conditions, and Education Level in North Dakota Adults

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Authors:

Amir Alakaam, PhD, RDN, LDN, MBChB
Madeline Lett, MPH, BSN
Hailey Puckett, MPH
Katherine Kite, BSPS

Objective:

Many socioeconomic factors can influence the consumption of a nutritious diet. To uncover factors influencing nutrition habits in North Dakota, we implemented a community-based nutrition education program.

Methods:

The program consisted of 6 educational sessions at a farmer’s market in North Dakota. We collected data through a questionnaire to assess individuals’ demographic information, health conditions, fruit and vegetable intake, and nutrition knowledge (N = 290). We analyzed the data using descriptive, chi-square, and one-way ANOVA analysis.

Results:

Overall, 37% of participants had a 4-year college degree, 20% had a master’s degree, 18% had a high school degree, and 17% had a 2-year or vocational degree. The chi-square analysis indicated a statistically significant correlation between education level and health condition (p = .010) and average total fruit and vegetable intake (p = .020). Participants with a higher level of education had fewer chronic disease diagnoses and ate more fruits and vegetables. The one-way ANOVA indicated a statistically significant relationship between education and nutrition knowledge (p < .001).

Conclusions:

Individuals with higher nutrition knowledge may have healthier eating habits and better health outcomes. Future nutrition education programs are needed to improve health equity and the population’s overall eating habits.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 9, Number 1, January 2022, pp. 636-644(9)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.9.1.2

2022-02-02T11:18:21-07:00February 1st, 2022|Free, Healthy People 2030|

Social Support and Decreased Likelihood of Alcohol Misuse among Persons with Dementia

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Authors:

Justin T. McDaniel, PhD Twitter
Kevin N. Hascup, PhD
Erin R. Hascup, PhD
David L. Albright, PhD
Juliane P. Wallace, PhD

Objective:

In this study, our aim was to improve understanding of the role of social support – which is the subject of a Healthy People 2030 goal – in the likelihood of adverse health behaviors among persons with subjective cognitive decline (SCD).

Methods:

We used a multinomial logistic regression model to examine the association between social support and alcohol misuse in a sample of individuals with SCD (N = 474) from the 2015-2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS).

Results:

Overall, 9.4% (95% CI = 6.7, 13.2) of the individuals with SCD reported “never” receiving needed social/emotional support and 7.0% (95% CI = 4.6, 10.5) of individuals with SCD reported “never” receiving help with activities of daily living. Results showed that 4.4% (95% CI = 2.7, 7.5) of participants reported heavy alcohol consumption, binge consumption of alcohol, or both. Lower scores on a 2-item composite measure of social support were associated with increased risk of binge consumption of alcohol with co-engagement in heavy alcohol use throughout the week (RRR = 1.92, p = .04) in adjusted analyses.

Conclusions:

We showed that low social support may be associated with an adverse health behavior among persons with SCD.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 9, Number 1, January 2022, pp. 628-635(8)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.9.1.1

2022-02-02T11:17:23-07:00February 1st, 2022|Free, Healthy People 2030|
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