Examining Auxiliary Verbs in a Salient Belief Elicitation

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Julie M. Maier, PhD
Kristen N. Jozkowski, PhD
María S. Montenegro, PhD
Malachi Willis, PhD
Ronna C. Turner, PhD
Brandon L. Crawford, PhD
Wen-Juo Lo, PhD

Objective:

Salient belief elicitations (SBEs) measure beliefs toward a health behavior through open-ended questions, with the purpose of developing close-ended survey questions. Auxiliary verbs used in SBE questions often differ (eg, What are the top 3 reasons you would/should decide to have an abortion?). We tested how 2 auxiliary verbs function in a SBE assessing abortion in English and Spanish: would/decidíra and should/debería.

Methods:

We administered a SBE survey online (N = 175) and in-person (N = 72); in-person participants also participated in cognitive interviews to assess question interpretation. Participants were assigned to survey versions that included identical SBE questions aside from auxiliary verbs— would/decidíra versus should/debería. Data analysis included: (1) content analysis of survey responses to assess differences in responses by version and (2) thematic analysis of interview data focused on interpretations of would/decidíra and should/debería.

Results:

Would/decidíra surveys generated more response categories. Similarly, cognitive interview findings suggest participants conceptualized would/decidíra as allowing for more options, while should/debería was thought to include only the most significant reasons/circumstances for abortion, potentially restricting participants’ responses.

Conclusions:

These findings have important measurement implications for researchers administering SBEs.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 4, July 2021, pp. 374-393(20)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.4.9

2021-08-26T16:38:50-06:00August 26th, 2021|Hispanic/Latinx Health, Research Methods|

Time to Scale-up Research Collaborations to Address the Global Impact of COVID-19 – A Commentary

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Authors:

Annie Lu Nguyen, PhD, MPH Twitter
Brandon Brown, PhD, MPH
Maha El Tantawi, PhD
Nicaise Ndembi, PhD
Joseph Okeibunor, PhD
Abdulaziz Mohammed, MD
Morenike Oluwatoyin Folayan, DMD

Objective:

In this commentary, we suggest that the unprecedented global impact of the COVID-19 pandemic provides a compelling reason for researchers to stretch beyond usual limits and find new ways to engage in global collaborations.

Methods:

We point to data that have emerged on the mental health and economic consequences of the pandemic to illustrate the extent to which these common issues cross national borders. There is high likelihood that these burdens will continue to persist long after the pandemic is declared “over.”

Results:

We urge researchers, particularly those from countries with higher income economies, to share resources to increase international collaborative research efforts. We present a case study of an ongoing project and offer some lessons learned for individual investigators.

Conclusions:

Global problems require global solutions. The COVID-19 pandemic is a global crisis that should prompt researchers to engage in science and research across national borders.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 3, May 2021, pp. 277-280(4)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.3.9

2021-06-30T21:28:53-06:00June 30th, 2021|COVID19, Research Methods|

The Intersection of Education and Healthcare: Supporting Children with Chronic Health Conditions

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Arnold Olszewski, PhD, CCC-SLP Twitter
Donna R. Scarborough, PhD, CCC-SLP
Gregory A. Szumlas, MD, FAAP

Objective:

Chronic health conditions in childhood have been negatively associated with linguistic, academic, and occupational outcomes. Traditionally, categorical diagnostic approaches relying on exclusionary criteria are used in healthcare services.

Methods:

This literature review examines research from various fields to evaluate the effects of chronic illness in cognitive-linguistic development in children. We explore the implications for different conceptualizations of the term “chronic illness.” We compare categorical and non-categorical diagnostic approaches, specifically in relation to children’s academic performance.

Results:

We provide recommendations for bridging the gap between healthcare and education to provide children with chronic conditions the best chance of thriving medically and academically. Definitions of chronic illness that rely on inclusive criteria and acknowledge individual variability seem best suited for clinical practice and research.

Conclusions:

Effective supports for children with chronic illness require evidence-based treatment approaches that are tailored to the unique needs of each individual child. Educators, healthcare providers, families, and related service providers must have open lines of communication to serve children with chronic health conditions. Early identification and intervention is crucial.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 2, March 2021, pp. 184-193(10)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.2.8

2021-04-29T21:50:23-06:00April 26th, 2021|Chronic Conditions, Research Methods, Youth|

School-level Factors and Consent Form Return Rate in a School-based Vision Program

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Holly Given, BS
Amanda Neitzel, PhD
Ahmed F. Shakarchi, MBChB, MPH
Megan E. Collins, MD, MPH Twitter

Objective:

School-based vision programs provide care directly in schools. Parental consent is typically required for student participation. In this paper, we examine school-level factors associated with consent form return.

Methods:

We included 123 schools served by a vision program in Baltimore, Maryland between the 2016-17 and 2018-19 school years. Multiple linear regression modeling was used to examine the associations between consent return rate and school type (elementary, elementary/middle or middle school), school size, student attendance, student mobility, percent of students in special education, poverty (percent eligible for free and reduced-price lunch), teacher qualifications, parent response rate to annual school climate survey, vision screening failure rate, and year of vision program participation (cohort).

Results:

The final model explained 26.2% of variability in consent return rate. Overall consent return rate was 57.8% (range 9.4%-100%). School size (β = -2.419, p < .01) and cohort (βCohort2 = 11.988, p < .01) were significantly associated with consent rate. Whereas poverty (β = 0.225, p < .10) and mobility (β = -0.647, p < .10) were relevant, they did not reach statistical significance.

Conclusions:

School-level factors are significantly associated with consent form return rates. School-based vision programs should consider additional measures to increase consent form return, especially in larger schools and schools with high rates of student mobility.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 2, March 2021, pp. 148-158(11)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.2.5

2021-04-30T14:04:40-06:00April 26th, 2021|Research Methods, Vision Health|
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