Nutrition

Assessing Fish to School Programs at 2 School Districts in Oregon

An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Addison Virta, MPH, RD
David C. Love, MSPH, PhD

Objective:

Farm to school (FTS) programs provide many established benefits to students and the community; however, fish to school programs are a less studied subset of FTS. The objective was to identify how fish to school programs are implemented, their impacts, and the enabling factors to support these programs.

Methods:

We conducted formative research and interviewed stakeholders from 2 school districts in Oregon in 2019.

Results:

Interviewees reported benefits of connecting students and the larger school community with local food and creating excitement from new lunch offerings. Factors that facilitated fish to school programs included strong program leaders and partnerships, FTS grant funding, and the creative use of resources. Challenges in maintaining the program included sustainable program funding, seafood distribution networks, recipe development, and higher cost per serving of seafood compared to other proteins.

Conclusions:

Resources exist for school professionals interested in starting or sustaining fish to school programs. These programs are difficult to launch and sustain, and thus, require many forms of support (institutional, financial, industry, culinary, etc) and benefit from innovations like fish to school aggregators and product development such as pre-prepared fish options.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 7, Number 6, December 2020, pp. 557-569(13)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.7.6.5

2021-04-29T22:09:00-06:00December 30th, 2020|Nutrition, Open Access, School Health|

Professional Development for Elementary School Teachers in Nutrition Education: A Content Synthesis of 23 Initiatives

An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Louisa R. Peralta, PhD Twitter
Thea Werkhoven, PhD
Wayne G. Cotton, PhD
Dean A. Dudley, PhD

Objective:

Although the importance of healthy eating is well known, eating patterns among school-aged children and adolescents rarely meet dietary guidelines. Schools are an effective and efficient setting for nutrition education; however, there is a dearth of research focusing on the key role of the teacher. In this study, we identified the role of professional development (PD) for elementary school teachers in delivering nutrition education programs.

Methods:

We used the results of a systematic literature search and meta-analysis to synthesize PD content reported in successful elementary school nutrition education programs (ie, ones reporting positive and significant changes in elementary school students’ nutritional outcomes).

Results:

Few studies provided evidence or methodologic descriptions of teacher PD. Of the 23 nutrition education programs assessed for descriptions of teacher PD, 14 provided print and electronic information or people resources, 12 detailed who delivered the teacher PD, and 11 described the PD duration.

Conclusion:

Our findings from this content synthesis suggest that whereas teachers can make improvements in nutritional outcomes, the teacher PD component is not only underreported but also understudied. Therefore, the role of teacher PD is not widely understood, particularly the extent to which teacher PD influences teacher pedagogical practices and student nutritional outcomes.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 7, Number 5, October 2020, pp. 374-396(23)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.7.5.1

2021-04-29T22:11:07-06:00October 15th, 2020|Nutrition|

Midwest Consumer Shopping Habits, Nutrition Knowledge, and Latino Tienda Use

An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Shelly M. Palmer, MS, RD
Donna M. Winham, DrPH, RD, MCHES Twitter

Objective:

In this study, we assessed the intrapersonal, interpersonal, and community influences on nutrition knowledge, views on healthy foods, grocery store choice, and grocery shopping patterns specifically at Latino tiendas, among Midwestern adults by Hispanic or non-Hispanic ethnicity.

Methods:

We surveyed a convenience sample of adults on an open-ended definition of healthy foods, nutrition knowledge, shopping behaviors, and reasons for store choice.

Results:

Of the 149 respondents, no ethnic differences were observed in qualitative definitions of healthy foods (low fat, unprocessed, high nutrient content). Fewer Hispanics than non-Hispanics correctly identified healthier options for rice, canned fruits, and canned tuna. Respondents indicated that proximity to home and food price were motivators of store choice. Significantly more Hispanics than non-Hispanics shopped at Walmart (42% vs 15%; p < .001), and at tiendas (77% vs 14%; p < .001). Food selection was the most frequent reason given by all for shopping at tiendas.

Conclusion:

Hispanics and non-Hispanics share similar views of healthy food definitions and important store characteristics. Non-Hispanics could potentially use tiendas more frequently considering expressed interests in food prices and selection. Some healthier food options that are culturally important were less known by Hispanics. Further research with a larger sample is needed to substantiate these preliminary findings.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 7, Number 2, March 2020, pp. 79-91(13)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.7.2.1

2021-04-29T22:25:47-06:00April 22nd, 2020|Nutrition, Open Access|
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