Open Access Articles

Problematic Internet Use, Related Psychosocial Behaviors, Healthy Lifestyle, and Subjective Health Complaints in Adolescents

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Aija Klavina, PhD
Viktors Veliks, PhD
Anna Zusa, PhD
Juris Porozovs, PhD
Aleksandrs Aniscenko, MSc
Luize Bebrisa-Fedotova, MSc

Objective:

In this study, we explored Internet use-associated psychosocial behavior problems in relationship to adolescents’ subjective health complaints and healthy lifestyle habits.

Methods:

A cross-sectional sample of Latvian adolescents (N = 570, age range 11-19 years) completed a survey. Problematic Internet use (PIU) was assessed by the Problematic and Risky Internet Use Screening Scale (PRIUSS) that measures social impairment, emotional impairment, and risky/impulsive Internet use. Subjective health complaints assessed were somatic complaints and psychological complaints. Healthy lifestyle behaviors assessed were daily physical activity, time spent using information technologies (IT), eating habits, and sleep duration.

Results:

We found that 27.02 % (N = 154) of the participants scored at risk for PIU with significantly higher PIU mean scores in 15-16-year-old girls (p <.05). Also, 15-16-year-old girls reported significantly higher prevalence of subjective health symptoms than boys and girls in other age groups (p < .05). There were statistically significant associations between PIU-related psychosocial behaviors and subjective health complaints and limited physical activity (p < .01).

Conclusions:

PIU behaviors, subjective health complaints and lack healthy lifestyles were common in adolescents in this study with a significantly high prevalence in 15-16-year-old girls.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 5, September 2021, pp. 451-464(14)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.5.6

2021-10-27T17:26:03-06:00October 27th, 2021|Adolescents, Technology Use|

Supporting Mental Health in School Settings: Findings from a Qualitative Evaluation

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Linda Weiss, PhD
Marilyn Jacob, PhD, LCSW
Maya Scherer, MPH
Anna Borkina, MS

Objective:

In this paper, we describe results from stakeholder interviews conducted to assess implementation and perceived outcomes of a project, implemented in 92 New York City middle and high schools, and focused on building the mental health-related skills of school personnel and promotion of healthier school environments.

Methods:

As part of a mixed-methods evaluation, we conducted 59 key stakeholder interviews with staff of participating community-based organizations and schools. Interview topics included mental health needs, project activities, engagement by school staff, strengths and challenges of the initiative, and perceived impact.

Results:

At the start of the project, interviewees reported difficulty comprehending the model and accepting its utility, given the direct service needs of students. Although concerns remained, we found positive impact, including increased awareness of mental health issues and their root causes, a greater sensitivity to students’ social and emotional challenges, and improved capacity to manage behavioral issues in the classroom.

Conclusions:

Although targeted approaches are needed for high-risk youth, population-level approaches may increase mental health knowledge and skills and support transformation leading to healthier school environments.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 5, September 2021, pp. 429-437(9)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.5.4

2021-10-27T18:54:25-06:00October 27th, 2021|Mental Health, School Health|

Face Mask Policies of US Public School Districts in States without Statewide Mandates

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Philip Jacobs, PhD
Arvi Ohinmaa

Objective:

We developed categories of the degree of restrictiveness of public schoolboards’ face mask policies in 10 US states that had no statewide mask mandates at any time during the COVID-19 pandemic. We collected data on schoolboards’ mask wearing policies for the individual boards in these states.

Methods:

We obtained school reopening plans found on school district webpages. We abstracted district mask policies and sorted them into groups indicating whether mask wearing was required or recommended.

Results:

Overall, 44% of boards mandated masks in school settings. There was a wide variation of policies within and between states.

Conclusions:

When left to their own resources, schoolboards will follow a variety of policies, many of which are a departure from state recommendations.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 5, September 2021, pp. 422-428(7)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.5.3

2021-10-27T17:15:38-06:00October 27th, 2021|COVID19, School Health|

Implementing Statewide Health Surveillance in Schools: Processes and Lessons Learned from the Texas SPAN Project

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Katherine A. Elder, PhD, MPAff
Carolyn Smith, BS
Claire Niday, MPH
Alison Winters Massie, DrPH
Amanda M. Reat, PhD, RD
Amier Haidar, BS
Michelle L. Cook, PhD, MPH
Deanna M. Hoelscher, PhD, RDN, LD, CNS, FISBNPA

Objective:

Prevalence of obesity among youth has increased in the last several decades. Using schools as a place to collect data on childhood obesity is considered by many researchers to be an important component to combating the disease. In this paper, we present process data from the Texas School Physical Activity and Nutrition (SPAN) project, a statewide surveillance system to monitor the prevalence of Texas school-aged children who have overweight/obesity.

Methods:

We selected 3 Public Health Regions (PHRs), including 30 districts and 140 schools, to represent geographic variability of processes of conducting this surveillance system. We tracked and analyzed administrative and communicative processes to conduct the Texas SPAN in those districts/schools.

Results:

The results demonstrate significant procedural variability across and within PHRs in implementing Texas SPAN. These variations occurred and are presented at both the district and school levels and relate to parental consent, communication processes, and time lags involved in approval and measurement.

Conclusions:

Due to the variability in the process data observed across and within PHRs, we recommend researchers interested in establishing obesity surveillance systems work to create statewide and local partnerships, cultivate strong communication, and develop mechanisms for data management.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 5, September 2021, pp. 412-421(10)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.5.2

2021-10-27T17:09:44-06:00October 27th, 2021|Community Health, School Health|

Five-year Survey of Personal Computer Work by the Staff of a Teacher Training University and Affiliated Schools

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Syou Maki, PhD
Yoko Sakakibara, MS
Naomi Hisanaga, MD

Objective:

Occupational research relevant to visual display terminal (VDT) work is expanding on a global scale. To date, examination of possible occupational health-related issues has been insufficient.

Methods:

We conducted a longitudinal survey (2007-2011) at a teacher training university, investigating various kinds of problematic VDT work, revealing the relationships between occupational and environmental factors (work content, workplace, and working posture) and ocular and musculoskeletal symptoms.

Results:

Whereas symptoms varied somewhat for men and women who were VDT users, “stooping posture” and “work time (≥ 6 hours)” were the causes of symptoms of “eye fatigue” for both sexes. We identified numerous other sex-specific symptoms as well.

Conclusions:

These results contribute to improvement of teachers’ occupational and environmental health and offer direction for pre-work education.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 5, September 2021, pp. 394-487(94)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.5.1

2021-10-27T17:04:03-06:00October 27th, 2021|Technology Use, Workplace|

Examining Auxiliary Verbs in a Salient Belief Elicitation

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Julie M. Maier, PhD
Kristen N. Jozkowski, PhD
María S. Montenegro, PhD
Malachi Willis, PhD
Ronna C. Turner, PhD
Brandon L. Crawford, PhD
Wen-Juo Lo, PhD

Objective:

Salient belief elicitations (SBEs) measure beliefs toward a health behavior through open-ended questions, with the purpose of developing close-ended survey questions. Auxiliary verbs used in SBE questions often differ (eg, What are the top 3 reasons you would/should decide to have an abortion?). We tested how 2 auxiliary verbs function in a SBE assessing abortion in English and Spanish: would/decidíra and should/debería.

Methods:

We administered a SBE survey online (N = 175) and in-person (N = 72); in-person participants also participated in cognitive interviews to assess question interpretation. Participants were assigned to survey versions that included identical SBE questions aside from auxiliary verbs— would/decidíra versus should/debería. Data analysis included: (1) content analysis of survey responses to assess differences in responses by version and (2) thematic analysis of interview data focused on interpretations of would/decidíra and should/debería.

Results:

Would/decidíra surveys generated more response categories. Similarly, cognitive interview findings suggest participants conceptualized would/decidíra as allowing for more options, while should/debería was thought to include only the most significant reasons/circumstances for abortion, potentially restricting participants’ responses.

Conclusions:

These findings have important measurement implications for researchers administering SBEs.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 4, July 2021, pp. 374-393(20)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.4.9

2021-08-26T16:38:50-06:00August 26th, 2021|Hispanic/Latinx Health, Research Methods|

A Cross-sectional Survey of Chinese Secondary School Students on Infectious Disease Prevention during the COVID-19 Outbreak

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Haitian Qiu
Zhongwei Liu, PhD
Haiyun Fang, MA

Objective:

Improving secondary school students’ knowledge and behaviors toward infectious dis- ease prevention is key to promoting their health. In this study, we evaluated secondary school students’ infectious disease prevention literacy, determined the sources of knowledge acquisition, and identified deficiencies in education programs.

Methods:

A questionnaire was disseminated through social media from February 1-5, 2020, starting from selected class group chats of stu- dents in Shaanxi, Gansu, and Jiangsu provinces. A total of 1761 responses were collected. The male-to-female ratio was 1.08:1. The chi-square test was employed to analyze data.

Results:

Most respondents reported that they were familiar with the standard 7-step handwashing method. Most respondents reported that their knowledge and behaviors of infectious disease prevention were mainly acquired through the Internet. The vast majority of respondents believed that more educa- tion programs are needed in secondary schools.

Conclusions:

Secondary school students’ knowl- edge and behaviors toward infectious disease prevention need to be improved. Infectious disease prevention programs on campuses should be increased in quantity, enriched in scope, refined in form, and improved in coherence and continuity.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 4, July 2021, pp. 353-364(12)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.4.7

2021-08-26T16:32:16-06:00August 26th, 2021|COVID19, School Health|

High School Students Voice Regarding School-based Physical Activity: Perceived Barriers and Facilitating Factors

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Marie-Maude Dubuc, PhD
Seira Fortin-Suzuki, MSc
Sylvie Beaudoin, PhD
Félix Berrigan, PhD
Sylvain Turcotte, PhD

Objective:

To contribute to the development of tailored school-based physical activity interventions, in this study, we aimed to identify the perceived facilitating factors and barriers of high school students toward their physical activity in the school environment.

Methods:

A total of 139 students from 4 different high schools completed an online questionnaire comprising open-ended questions on their perceived facilitating factors and barriers toward their physical activity at school. Thereafter, 100 of these students participated in one of the 16 focus groups designed to deepen students’ responses regarding their perceived facilitating factors and barriers. Qualitative content analysis was performed to classify data according to the Social-Ecological Model.

Results:

Through questionnaires, students mostly identified intrapersonal elements as facilitating factors and barriers to their practice of physical activity, as opposed to institutional factors during the focus groups. Girls strongly valued the characteristics of the interventions and of the involved school stakeholders.

Conclusions:

Our results allow us to qualify the current understanding of high school students’ perceived facilitating factors and barriers toward school-based physical activity and strengthen the relevance of surveying students prior to the development and implementation of physical activity interventions.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 4, July 2021, pp. 331-341(11)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.4.5

2021-08-26T16:24:54-06:00August 26th, 2021|Adolescents, Physical Activity, School Health|

Perceptions and Barriers to Physical Activity in Childhood and Adulthood Among Latinas

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Rosenda Murillo, PhD
Mariana Vazquez, BA
Isabel Martinez Leal, PhD
Daphne C. Hernandez, PhD
Qian Lu, MD, PhD
Lorraine R. Reitzel, PhD

Objective:

The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify perceptions and barriers to physical activity in childhood and adulthood among Latina adults.

Methods:

We conducted 3 focus groups, 2 dyadic interviews, and an individual interview using semi-structured interview guides with 23 Latina women aged 21-35. A thematic analysis approach employing inductive and deductive coding was utilized to code, categorize, and summarize data into themes.

Results:

The themes that emerged focused on: (1) physical activity is enjoyable; (2) family influenced physical activity; (3) different lifestyle in the US influenced physical activity; (4) physical activity is important for health; and (5) responsibilities (eg, work, caregiving) as barriers to physical activity in adulthood.

Conclusions:

Perceptions and barriers to physical activity experienced in both childhood and adulthood should be considered in the promotion of physical activity among Latinas.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 4, July 2021, pp. 294-304(11)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.4.2

2021-08-26T16:18:31-06:00August 26th, 2021|Hispanic/Latinx Health, Physical Activity|

Drug Story Theater: A Mixed-Methods Study of a Peer-to-Peer Approach to Substance Abuse Education

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Joseph Shrand, MD Twitter
Madeline DiGiovanni, BS
Dana Lee, BS
Anita Kishore, MD
Andrés Martin, MD, MPH

Objective:

Drug Story Theater (DST) is a peer-to-peer intervention that engages teenagers in the early stages of their recovery to develop shows about the seduction of, addiction to, and recovery from drugs and alcohol.

Methods:

We analyzed anonymous surveys completed by students before and after attending a DST performance, and transcripts of focus group interviews conducted with (1) program developers, (2) stakeholders, (3) performers, and (4) audience members.

Results:

Students (N = 871) from 5 schools attended one of 2 DST performances. Participants demonstrated increased knowledge on 5 fact-based questions (mean improvement range, 19%- 35%; p < .001 for all), and favorable changes on 10 items addressing perceptions regarding substance use risk (paired t test range, 3.9-9.4; p < .001 for all). Through iterative thematic analysis we developed an alliterative “7P” model spanning 2 domains: (1) Participants (Performers and Peers); and (2) Program (Partnerships, Practicalities, and Prevention).

Conclusions:

Exposure to a DST performance improved knowledge and risk perceptions about addiction among middle and high school students. It remains to be seen if those changes can have an effect on the prevention of substance use and dependence among vulnerable youth, and whether the active components of DST can be replicated in other school environments.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 8, Number 4, July 2021, pp. 281-293(13)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.8.4.1

2021-08-26T16:09:29-06:00August 26th, 2021|Adolescents, School Health, Substance Use|
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