Open Access Articles

Adolescents’ Nicotine/Tobacco Dependency Symptoms Using 4 Waves of PATH Data

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Carol J. Boyd, PhD Twitter
Sean Esteban McCabe, PhD
Rebecca J. Evans-Polce, PhD
Terri Voepel-Lewis, PhD
Clayton Shuman, PhD
Philip Veliz, PhD

Objective:

We aimed to characterize male and female adolescents’ use of e-cigarettes, cigarettes and dual use, and 7 symptoms of nicotine/tobacco dependence using 4 waves of national data from the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study.

Methods:

The analytic sample included 2902 adolescents 12-17 years old, who indicated past 30-day e-cigarette or cigarette use at least once between 2013-2018. We used items from the Wisconsin Inventory of Smoking Dependence Motives (WISDM-68) to report dependence symptoms.

Results:

Compared to cigarette users, exclusive e-cigarette users reported fewer symptoms of nicotine dependency. There were no differences between males and females concerning the odds of any reported dependency symptom. Among cigarette only users, the odds of indicating that their tobacco use helps them think better (AOR = 2.38, 95% CI = 1.08, 5.23) and wanting tobacco after waking up (AOR = 5.50, 95% CI = 1.10, 27.5) was higher among females versus males.

Conclusions:

These results extend earlier findings regarding subgroup differences in nicotine/tobacco dependency symptoms participating in the PATH Study and highlights the importance of identifying nicotine/tobacco dependency symptoms when counseling adolescent males and females.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 9, Number 4, July 2022, pp. 980-995(16)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.9.4.6

2022-08-20T09:51:41-06:00August 20th, 2022|Adolescents, Tobacco|

Educational Discrimination of Honor Culture Men and the Impact of Sports, Key Demographics, and Affiliations

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Rebecca S. Merkin, PhD Twitter
Sigmund Shipp, PhD

Objective:

We identified predictors of educational discrimination among all races with a particular focus on the understudied white male population that has a lower socioeconomic status (SES).

Methods:

Employment of Bourdieu’s cultural capital theoretical framework, HSLS data, and hierarchical regression modeling, underlie this study that explored predictors of educational discrimination.

Results:

Playing sports does not impact experiences with educational discrimination. The higher the SES, the less likely people are discriminated against overall (r = -.20; p < .001) and in honor cultures (r = -.30; p < .001), but not in non-honor cultures. One- versus 2-parent homes, and the number of children a respondent has had no impact on perceived discrimination. Across all models, black, LatinX, and students of other races experience greater educational discrimination than their white peers. Members of all races in honor cultures experience educational discrimination. However, this relationship is also moderated by SES in that lower- income white honor culture males experience greater educational discrimination than their higher- income counterparts.

Conclusions:

Findings indicate that low SES is prominent in educational discrimination; consequently, inclusion programs to increase educational opportunities, as identified in Healthy People 2030, to help children and adolescents do well in school are warranted.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 9, Number 4, July 2022, pp. 961-971(11)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.9.4.4

2022-08-20T09:52:31-06:00August 20th, 2022|Physical Activity, Youth|

School Nurses’ Perspectives of Bullying Involvement of Adolescents with Chronic Health Conditions

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Sally S. Cohen, PhD, RN, FAAN
Laura Grunin, MSN, RN
Timothy C. Guetterman, PhD, MA

Objective:

Our primary objective was to understand bullying as it pertains to middle school students with chronic physical or behavioral health conditions by examining it through the lens of school nurses. A second objective was to understand issues pertaining to implementation of New York’s bullying prevention law with a focus on these same students.

Methods:

We employed a qualitative descriptive design with purposive sampling to explore perspectives of school nurses in New York State who worked in public middle schools. Using a semi-structured protocol, we conducted audio-recorded telephone interviews that were transcribed for subsequent thematic analysis.

Results:

Twelve nurses agreed to be interviewed. Results revealed participants’ under- standing of bullying as related to students with chronic health conditions, especially those with behavioral health issues. Results also showed nurses’ limited understanding of New York’s bullying prevention law and missed opportunities for school nurses as champions of students with chronic health conditions who are bullied.

Conclusions:

Education and health care professionals should collaborate to disseminate information to school personnel about the risks of bullying for students with chronic health conditions and operationalize plans for prevention.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 9, Number 3, May 2022, pp. 877-893(17)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.9.3.5

2022-06-11T16:22:28-06:00June 11th, 2022|Adolescents, Mental Health, School Health|

Effect of Emotional Distress Monitoring and Intervention in Preventing Non-suicidal Self-injury (NSSI) of College Students

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Chunrong Chen, MPH, CHES
Xianrong Li, MS
Yu Deng, MPH, CHES

Objective:

In this study, we monitored and intervened in the emotional status of college students to understand the effect of intervention measures on the prevention and control of non-suicidal self-harm, and to provide a reference for the prevention and control of self-harm in college students.

Methods:

We conducted a baseline survey of 1832 first-year students across 3 vocational colleges in Chongqing, China in October 2019. In October 2020, we followed-up regarding the non- suicidal self-injury (NSSI) occurrences among our original respondents. During the year, students’ emotions were regularly monitored. The students who scored > 10 and had moderate suicidal thoughts were provided counseling to reduce their emotional stress. If the students could not reduce these emotions, their counselors contacted the school psychological center for professional counseling. If the school psychological counseling center diagnosed the students with severe depression, the counselors informed their parents and suggested hospital treatment.

Results:

The detection rate of NSSI history was 18.52% (320/1728), and the detection rate of the follow-up survey was 8.13% (137/1685); the difference in the detection rate was statistically significant (X2 = 128.3103, p < .001).

Conclusions:

Our results show that monitoring and intervening in college students’ emotional states can prevent the occurrence of NSSI behavior.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 9, Number 3, May 2022, pp. 846-852(7)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.9.3.2

2022-06-11T16:17:57-06:00June 11th, 2022|College Health, Interventions, Mental Health|

Non-reimbursable Workload in Pediatric Diabetes Care – the Providers’ Perspective

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Ksenia N. Tonyushkina, MD
Nicholas Koran
Ines Guttmann-Bauman, MD

Objective:

In this study, we quantified the amount of time that pediatric diabetes care providers spend in non-reimbursable activities and evaluated the predictors related to clinic structure and educational and behavioral care diabetes support.

Methods:

We distributed an anonymous electronic survey via email to Pediatric Endocrine Society (PES) members and requested information about their practice and about non-reimbursable time spent during an average week not on call.

Results:

A total of 96 diabetes providers completed the survey. Most providers spent 1-2 hours a day on non-billable activities and 60% of them worked on weekends. Providers from medium sized programs and those without fellowships saw more patients than providers from small and large programs and those with fellowships. The same groups had the least assistance from certified diabetes care and education specialists (CDCES) and social workers. Providers from practices allowing CDCES to review blood glucose data and adjust insulin spent significantly less time on this activity themselves.

Conclusions:

We call for the development of new reimbursement models, noting increasing demands of technology, need for longitudinal care between visits and ensuring sustainability and equity of pediatric diabetes care.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 9, Number 3, May 2022, pp. 839-845(7)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.9.3.1

2022-06-11T16:14:01-06:00June 11th, 2022|Chronic Conditions, Clinicians, Healthcare Delivery|

Weight Perception and Weight Control Behavior among Florida High School Students

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Deana A. Hildebrand, PhD, RD
Jeremy Humphrey, MS
Lindsi Lemons, MPH

Objective:

Actions adopted by adolescents to control their weight are motivated by their body weight perception. In this study, we aimed to investigate the association between body weight perception and weight control behavior among Florida public high school students.

Methods:

We analyzed data from the 2015 Florida Youth Risk Behavior Survey (N = 3798). We used chi-square test to detect group differences among survey respondents and multivariate logistic regression to assess the association between weight perception and weight control behavior.

Results:

Most survey respondents adopted healthy actions such as exercise and diet, 75.3% and 55.0%, respectively, and few used unhealthy ones as weight control means, such as fasting, use of diet products, and purging, 15.6%, 7.3%, and 6.5% respectively. Compared to respondents who considered themselves as having the right weight, there were higher odds of engaging in healthy activities only in respondents who considered themselves as being overweight while there were higher odds of engaging in unhealthy actions in respondents perceiving themselves as underweight and in those viewing themselves as overweight.

Conclusions:

High school health education courses should include modules educating students on the importance of having accurate knowledge about body weight and adopting a healthy weight control behavior.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 9, Number 2, March 2022, pp. 815-827(13)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.9.2.8

2022-04-11T11:30:35-06:00April 11th, 2022|Health Policy, Lifestyle, School Health|

Beliefs Underlying US Adults’ Intention to Stay Home during the COVID-19 Pandemic

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Christopher Owens, PhD, MPH Twitter
Kristina Hunter-Mullis, MS
Jonathan T. Macy, PhD, MPH
Stephanie Dickinson, MS
Susan E. Middlestadt, PhD

Objective:

In this study, we estimated the relative contribution of 4 Reasoned Action Approach (RAA) belief determinants in explaining intention to stay home during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Methods:

Data were obtained from a survey of a nationally representative sample of US adults (N = 942) conducted April 10-20, 2020 (about one-month after initial stay-at-home orders were implemented) using a probability-based Internet household panel (Ipsos KnowledgePanel). Multiple regression analysis tested the association between attitude, injunctive norm, descriptive norm, and self-efficacy and intention to stay home for the next month while controlling for demographic factors. We tested for a moderating effect of worker status on the relationships between the 4 RAA beliefs and intention.

Results:

Instrumental attitude, injunctive norm, descriptive norm, and self-efficacy demonstrated statistically significant independent associations with intention to stay home. Self-efficacy showed the highest independent association. However, this relation was modified by an interaction between self-efficacy and worker status, revealing that self-efficacy is particularly important for essential workers.

Conclusions:

These findings suggest that public health strategies to increase individuals’ intention to stay home and encourage adherence to stay- at-home policies should focus on enhancing self-efficacy with communication and policy supports. To be most effective, interventions should be targeted based on worker status.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 9, Number 2, March 2022, pp. 828-838(11)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.9.2.9

2022-03-30T22:11:26-06:00March 30th, 2022|COVID19, Health Beliefs|

Non-profit Coordinated School Health Program Achieves Student Outcomes in Both Beginning and Experienced Schools

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Deana A. Hildebrand, PhD, RD
Jeremy Humphrey, MS
Lindsi Lemons, MPH

Objective:

The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of an ongoing health promotion program to sustain student outcomes over an extended period, and to determine if student outcomes are affected by the schools’ duration of program participation.

Methods:

The repeat- measures study used secondary data from Healthy Schools Oklahoma for School Years 2016-2019. FITNESSGRAM® assessed changes in student fitness levels (N = 12,219); an electronic health survey assessed changes in knowledge and behaviors (N = 6840). McNemar tests examined change in the proportion of students reaching the healthy fitness zone (HFZ) for 6 FITNESSGRAM® tests, and the proportion of students with accurate knowledge or meeting dietary and physical activity recommendations. Poisson regression tested for change in student outcomes based on duration of program participation.

Results:

The proportion of students reaching HFZ increased for 5 of 6 fitness tests (p ≤ .004) and with accurate nutrition and physical education knowledge (p ≤ .009). We found statistically significant main effects for outcomes (p ≤ .016) and duration (p ≤ .030); there was no effect for the interaction.

Conclusions:

Students achieved similar gains in outcomes regardless of the schools’ duration of program participation.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 9, Number 2, March 2022, pp. 765-775(11)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.9.2.4

2022-03-30T22:10:15-06:00March 30th, 2022|Nutrition, Physical Activity, School Health|

American Women’s Perceptions of Pandemic Policies and Regulations

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Christine G. Cardinal, JD, MPH
Jennifer A. Bunn, PhD
Isaac Schley, MPH
Daphne S. Fulton, DrPH
Rosanne Keathley, PhD

Objective:

We surveyed 287 American women from April 2020 until the November 2020 presidential election to evaluate their primary news source, beliefs on the constitutionality of mask-wearing and stay-at-home orders, government’s ability to implement public health orders, and political affiliation.

Methods:

Qualtrics surveys were distributed on social media. Using a chi-square test of independence, we evaluated differences by age groups, ethnicity, and education.

Results:

Age, ethnicity, and education were all statistically related to beliefs about public health initiatives.

Conclusions:

These results can help tailor public health interventions, policies, and laws focused on compliance with public health initiatives aimed at reducing the spread of the virus.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 9, Number 2, March 2022, pp. 751-764(14)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.9.2.3

2022-03-30T22:09:07-06:00March 30th, 2022|COVID19, Health Policy, Women's Health|

Evaluating School Profiles to Determine Risk for Teen Suicide

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An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.
The full article is available as a PDF download.

Authors:

Nancy Eigel-Miller, MS
Lisa M. Vaughn, PhD
Michael Topmiller, PhD
Olga Semanova, MS
Jonelle Prideaux, BA
Kamali Bouvay, MD
Cheryl Hilvert, MA, LPCC
Erica Page, PhD

Objective:

In this study, we examined characteristics and school contexts to identify profiles of schools at highest risk for suicide in Cincinnati, Ohio and the surrounding geographic area.

Methods:

We conducted a retrospective cohort study supplemented by context analysis. Adolescent data included total psychiatric-related pediatric emergency department encounters, psychiatric-related inpatient admissions, and suicide encounters/admissions aggregated to school level. School factors included type, size, geographic location, academic rigor, existence of a mental health partner, and culture of suicide prevention efforts at the school.

Results:

Using a k-means cluster analysis, 173 schools were sorted into 4 distinct clusters based on based on patient data linked to schools. A context analysis of the 25 highest risk schools revealed general patterns of low academic achievement measures, limited mental health partnership, and poor suicide prevention ratings.

Conclusions:

These findings suggest that schools which already reflect limited access to resources are the same ones disparately at higher risk for suicide in our geographic area. The variation of at- risk suicidality factors across schools suggests the need for tailored suicide prevention interventions specific to school characteristics and context.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 9, Number 2, March 2022, pp. 738-750(13)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.9.2.2

2022-03-30T22:07:38-06:00March 30th, 2022|Adolescents, Mental Health|
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