Open Access Articles

Perceived Impact and Feasibility of Health Equity Policy Actions among Obesity Practitioners, Researchers, and Policymakers

A Fast Track Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.

Authors:

Alexandra B. Morshed, PhD
Valerie Madas, MPH
Sarah J. Kang, MPH
Fanice Thomas, PhD
Rachel G. Tabak, PhD
Ian Thomas, PhD
Mary C. Politi, PhD
Amy A. Eyler, PhD
Debra Haire-Joshu, PhD
Elizabeth A. Dodson, PhD
Edward Tsai, PhD
Renee G. Parks, MS
Ross C. Brownson, PhD

Objective:

There is a broad array of health equity policy actions that may be important for addressing social determinants of obesity. The objective of this study was to identify local policy actions most salient for addressing health equity among practitioners, policymakers, and researchers active in obesity.

Methods:

We surveyed 195 participants in August-November 2020, including US public health practitioners, local policymakers, and researchers active in obesity policy or health equity. We asked them to select the most important health equity policy actions and rate them for potential impact and feasibility.

Results:

Living wage and access to early education scored highly across 3 dimensions of importance, potential impact, and feasibility among 3 of the 4 groups – local public service employees and policymakers, academics, and others. Local public service employees and policymakers also rated expanded childcare and job/skills training programs highly across all 3 dimensions. Respondents rated policy actions higher for potential impact than feasibility.

Conclusions:

We present novel, timely findings for prioritizing health equity policy actions for addressing obesity at the local level. Several policy actions not typically considered in obesity research were identified as salient by groups relevant to local obesity policymaking.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 11, Number 2, April 2024, pp. 1539-1548(10)
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
Article Link: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.11.2.5

2024-06-13T15:36:40-06:00May 31st, 2024|Health Equity|

The Wellbeing of Rural K-12 Educators: Applying PERMA in Rural Schools during the COVID-19 Pandemic

A Fast Track Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.

Authors:

Benjamin C. Ingman, PhD
Elizabeth Anderson, PhD
Sandra Bertram Grant, MEd
Elaine S. Belansky, PhD

Objective:

In this paper we describe the status of wellbeing for school personnel in the 2021-22 school year through the PERMA framework and the extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic adversely impacted dimensions of wellbeing.

Methods:

We administered the workplace wellbeing survey (a quantitative instrument based on PERMA) to school staff members in a rural/frontier region of a western state of the United States. Overall, 777 persons completed it, including 463 teachers from 23 school districts.

Results:

PERMA constructs of meaning and accomplishment were higher than other constructs and may serve as an anchor for wellbeing in education. Teachers showed lower levels of positive emotion, engagement, and accomplishment, when compared to nonteachers in schools. When compared with non-Hispanic personnel, Hispanic personnel had lower levels of wellbeing in the domain of relationships and reported a more severe adverse impact from the COVID-19 pandemic on both social and physical wellbeing.

Conclusions:

Adopting a more nuanced view of educator wellbeing, as defined by more than the mere absence of burnout and attrition is critical to fostering educational practices that promote the flourishing of school personnel.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
Article Link: https://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/psp/hbpr/pre-prints/content-psp_hbpr_1124

2024-05-31T09:58:23-06:00May 30th, 2024|COVID19, Rural Health, School Health|

A Reflection on 10 Years of Health Behavior and Policy Review

An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.

Authors:

Robert J. McDermott, PhD
Annie L. Nguyen, MPH, PhD

Objective:

In this historical brief about the journal, we examine the original and future intentions of Health Behavior and Policy Review as a contributor to the scholarly literature and look back at some of the challenges faced by academic journals.

Methods:

We review the purpose and principles upon which the journal was founded and offer some of the journal’s highlights of the past decade.

Results:

We report some specific benchmarks of achievement – notably major coverage of historically relevant and emerging public health issues, linkage with World Health Organization and Healthy People 2030 objectives, articulation of health behavior and policy, and recognition of the journal’s impact factor and rank among peer journals in social sciences and humanities.

Conclusions:

The journal has evolved into an outlet for reporting the results of scientific research and learned opinion that is international in scope.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 11, Number 1, February 2024
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
Article Link: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.11.1.7

2024-03-27T15:56:25-06:00March 27th, 2024|Health Policy, Healthy People 2030|

Total vs Partial Workplace Tobacco Use Bans in Texas Behavioral Health Centers: Employees’ Perceptions Related to Best Practices Implementation

An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.

Authors:

Sriya N. Kakarla & Noor Shabaneh (Authors contributed equally)
Midhat Z. Jafry, BS
Maggie Britton, PhD
Anastasia Rogova, PhD
Brian J. Carter, JD
Tzuan A. Chen, PhD
Isabel Martinez Leal, PhD
Bryce Kyburz, MA
Teresa Williams, MS
Lorraine R. Reitzel, PhD

Objective:

Tobacco-free workplace policies (TFWPs) at behavioral health treatment centers can curb clients’ tobacco use and secondhand smoke/vape exposure. However, there is little extant observational research about how total versus partial workplace tobacco use bans are associated with employees’ perceptions of best tobacco-related practices in behavioral health centers. Little is understood about the relationship between total or partial TFWPs and other factors that influence evidence-based client care including employees’ beliefs and their tobacco treatment practices. In this study, we examined these associations within Local Mental Health Authorities (LMHAs) providing behavioral healthcare throughout Texas.

Methods:

Employees from 30 of 39 LMHAs (> 75% of Texas’ statewide service area) responded to a 2021 survey on their TFWP characteristics. We explored associations between the TFWP (total vs partial) and variables of interest using independent proportions tests (p < .10).

Results:
LMHAs with total TFWPs reported clearer signage, more consistent enforcement, and greater client, contractor, and visitor awareness (ps = .013 to .078). They were also more likely to offer tobacco screening training, promote the Quitline, and believe in the benefits of concurrent treatment of behavioral health needs and tobacco use (ps = .024 to .079).

Conclusions:

LMHAs with partial TFWPs had weaknesses in communication, enforcement, awareness, and greater barriers to tobacco use care. There are opportunities for collaboration between LMHAs to share policies and care-facilitation practices to reduce the research-to-practice gap and resultant tobacco use inequities statewide.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 11, Number 1, February 2024
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
Article Link: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.11.1.4

2024-03-27T15:36:38-06:00March 22nd, 2024|Tobacco|

Improving Water Consumption in Underserved Elementary Schools: Implementation and Evaluation of a School-based Hydration Initiative

An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.

Authors:

Kristina L. Tatum, PsyD
Jessica Gokee LaRose, PhD
Danyel I. Smith, PhD
Mary Dunne Stewart, MSW
Elizabeth Theriault, MPH, MSW
Melanie K. Bean, PhD

Objective:

Our objective was to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a school-based hydration initiative in elementary schools.

Methods:

Hydration initiative included (1) placement of hydration stations, (2) promotional and educational activities during “Water Week,” and (3) provision of reusable water bottles. Surveys were administered at baseline and follow-up to assess student beverage intake and perceptions about the school’s environmental hydration policies and practices. Water bottle fills were assessed objectively at baseline, post-Water Week, and followup via weekly counts from hydration stations.

Results:
Water use increased post-Water Week (2.97±2.14), declining to 0.71±0.47 2 weeks later. At follow-up, frequency of soda consumption decreased (-.01 times/day; p < .001), self-reported water refill station use increased (p = .011), and a decrease (-.04 cups/day) in overall daily water intake (p = .043). At follow-up, there was an increase in the percentage of school personnel who reported their school promoted water as the best choice (p = .039). Students and teachers reported positive attitudes towards hydration stations, with some concerns about water bottle use in classrooms.

Conclusions:

The intervention reduced soda consumption and improved school hydration culture. Results can inform hydration policy and programming efforts for elementary school students.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 11, Number 1, February 2024
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
Article Link: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.11.1.6

2024-03-27T15:54:54-06:00March 15th, 2024|School Health|

Social Connections as a Catalyst for Improved Mental Health and Health Behavior among Long-term Survivors of HIV

An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.

Authors:

Moka Yoo-Jeong, PhD, RN
Erik L. Ruiz, MPH
Jerome T. Galea, PhD, MSW
Andrea N. Polonijo, PhD, MPH
Jasmine L. Lopez, BS
Karah Greene, MSW
Chris Christensen
Jeff Taylor
Brandon Brown, MPH, PhD
Annie L. Nguyen, MPH, PhD

Objective:

In this commentary, we present our views on the importance of catalyzing social connections for mental well-being and effective health behavior, collectively, with special emphasis on long-term survivors of HIV.

Methods:

We examine select literature pertinent to mental health and HIV survivorship, including the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Results:

Long-term HIV survivors face a substantial burden of health disparities and intersecting risk factors for comorbid health conditions.

Conclusions:

An ongoing commitment to social support interventions is imperative to structure an environment where people can connect and thrive.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 11, Number 1, February 2024
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
Article Link: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.11.1.5

2024-03-27T15:42:36-06:00March 15th, 2024|HIV, Mental Health|

A Pilot Study of Physician Assistant Student and Alumni Attitudes, Awareness, and Perceptions of Medical and Recreational Marijuana

An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.

Authors:

Kathryn Lawler
Abigail Strauss, BS
Allison Kaczmarek, MPH, PhD
Mary P. Martinasek, RRT, MPH, PhD

Objective:

In this study, we aimed to explore current physician assistant (PA) student and alumni attitudes, knowledge, and perceptions towards recreational and medical marijuana.

Methods:

We conducted a cross-sectional study with PA students and alumni (N = 62) from a mid-sized university in the southeastern United States. We used an online QualtricsTM survey of 40 questions pertaining to both medical and recreational marijuana.

Results:

When asked about counseling patients on medical marijuana only 50.8% felt comfortable. Even fewer were comfortable with discussing drug interactions (39%). Participants felt that edibles were the safest route of administration (46.8%). The majority felt patient counseling should be incorporated into health sciences courses (79.7%). There was a statistically significant association between their knowledge and their comfort in answering questions about marijuana (p < .001) and between their knowledge and their comfort in addressing drug interactions (p = .005).

Conclusions:

Our results align with previous research concluding that a greater amount of marijuana education should be incorporated into healthcare professionals’ curricula.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 11, Number 1, February 2024
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
Article Link: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.11.1.3

2024-03-27T15:45:11-06:00March 1st, 2024|Substance Use|

Health Risk Factors of Fishermen in West Seram Regency, Indonesia

An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.

Authors:

Sahrir Sillehu, PhD
Tri Niswati Utami, PhD
Ilyas Ibrahim, PhD
Zulfikar Peluw, MSN
Zulfikar Lating, MPH

Objective:

Fishermen are a group of workers who play a major role in the development of a country’s economy but are susceptible to health challenges due to the high-risk nature of their profession. Therefore, in this study, we determined the health risk factors among fishermen in West Seram Regency, Indonesia.

Methods:

We used a cross-sectional design to develop a predictive model for fishermen’s health. We collected data through a survey using validated and reliable questionnaires, followed by analysis with multiple logistic regression. The sample population consisted of 114 participants.

Results:

Smoking, exercise, and diving habits influenced the health of the participants with p-values of .016, .005, and .001, respectively. Parents’ health history also had a significant impact, with a p-value of .021. Furthermore, it was considered to be the dominant factor, possessing an Exp(B) value of 6.7.

Conclusions:

Based on the findings, these groups of workers were advised to maintain health through smoking cessation, engaging in regular physical activity, and undergoing regular check-ups at primary healthcare facilities.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 11, Number 1, February 2024
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
Article Link: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.11.1.2

2024-03-27T15:47:35-06:00February 29th, 2024|Occupational Health|

Health and Social Service Needs of People who Inject Drugs Living in Rural Settings in the United States: A Qualitative Study

An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.

Authors:

William Bull, MD
Cahit Kaya, PhD
Wajiha Z. Akhtar, PhD
Joshua Wilke, MD
Sarah Krechel, PhD
Randall Brown, MD
Ryan P. Westergaard, MD
David W. Seal, PhD

Objective:

Rural communities continue to be among the most severely affected by the opioid epidemic, showing some of the highest rates of overdose deaths and increasing rates of injection drug use. Lack of resources among other barriers contribute to the needs of this population going unmet. We assessed service needs among people who inject drugs (PWID) in rural regions, barriers to the implementation of these services, and optimal strategies to intervene with people who inject drugs, as well as to better link them to needed programs and services.

Methods:

We carried out thematic content analysis of 46 in-depth interviews with key respondents who worked with or had knowledge of the needs of PWID.

Results:

Respondents saw a need for increased access to services (eg, healthcare, harm reduction, addiction treatment), different treatment options, and education related to substance use as the most needed services among this population.

Conclusions:

Opioid use disorder interventions and initiatives must address these core service and education needs to best serve PWID. Increasing access to services in rural communities must be a priority for policymakers, local respondents, and healthcare providers.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 11, Number 1, February 2024
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
Article Link: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.11.1.1

2024-03-27T15:49:43-06:00February 4th, 2024|Opioid Use, Rural Health|

Biomedical Risk Factors for COVID-19 among People Living with HIV during the First Wave of the Pandemic

An Open Access article published in the Health Behavior and Policy Review Journal.

Authors:

Morenike Oluwatoyin Folayan, MBA, MEd, FWACS
Roberto Ariel Abeldaño Zuñiga, MPH, PhD
Nourhan Moustafa Aly, MSc
Muhammad Abrar Yousaf, MSc
Passent Ellakany, PhD
Ifeoma Idigbe, MSc
Folake Barakat Lawal, PhD, FWACS, FMCDS
Zumama Khalid, MSc
Joanne Lusher, PhD
Jorma Virtanen, DDS, PhD, MScPH
Maha El Tantawi, PhD

Objective:

We assessed the associations between testing positive for COVID-19 and HIV viral load, and access to and adherence to antiretroviral therapy during the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Methods:

We conducted a secondary analysis of data, where we extracted complete information for 904 participants self-identifying as HIV positive. The dataset encompassed the dependent variable (testing positive for COVID-19), independent variables (HIV viral load, access to a 90-day supply of antiretroviral drugs, adherence to antiretroviral therapy), and confounding variables (age, sex assigned at birth, living with HIV co-morbidities, and self-reported depression).

Results:

Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (AOR: 0.364; 95% CI: 0.231-0.574; p < .001) was significantly association with decreased odds of testing positive for COVID-19. We found no statistically significant associations between HIV viral load or access to a 90-day supply of antiretroviral drugs and testing positive for COVID-19.

Conclusions:

The results underscore the necessity for ongoing HIV treatment adherence counseling for individuals with HIV during the COVID-19 pandemic. Further research is warranted to elucidate the paradox wherein adherence to antiretroviral therapy was associated with testing positive for COVID-19, but HIV viral load was not.

Source: Health Behavior and Policy Review, Volume 10, Number 6, December 2023
Publisher: Paris Scholar Publishing Ltd.
Article Link: https://doi.org/10.14485/HBPR.10.6.3

2024-03-27T15:52:33-06:00January 24th, 2024|COVID19, HIV|
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